davesummer's picture

A large unidentified butterfly or moth

Observed: 12th August 2009 By: davesummer
CIMG5105
CIMG5108
CIMG5109
Description:

About 5-6 cm long, perhaps 9-10 cm wide in full flight.
Bright orange, cream and dark brown. Gives illusion that head may be at the tail-end. Changes appearance when the wings are fully extended.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Jersey Tiger (Euplagia quadripunctaria) interacts

Comments

RoyW's picture

This may be a fairly notable record.

Assuming that I haven't made a mistake with the identification, this might be a fairly unusual record.

Jersey Tigers are resident in some parts of south-west Britain (and perhaps on the Sussex coast) but, unless my information is out of date (& it may well be when it comes to moths!), they are are only a scarce migrant in the London area.

davesummer's picture

Jersey Tiger

Thank you for your identification which appears to be perfectly correct. I have certainly never spotted one before. Regional warming may bring more of them further north. It will be interesting to see if others are spotted this summer (if we have one).

rimo's picture

There is a known breeding

There is a known breeding colony in London - it's been there for several years now. Nice find!

Record your ladybird sightings!
www.harlequin-survey.org
www.ladybird-survey.org

davesummer's picture

Breeding colony

Very interesting. Do you know the approximate location of the breeding colony?
I just wonder how near it is to my sighting?

RoyW's picture

I should have googled it!

An internet search shows that they are breeding in London - it seems to be unclear whether they reached London naturally or as an accidental/deliberate introduction though.
It looks like the London population is mainly centred on the Lewisham/Catford/East Dulwich area in south London.

AndyBanthorpe's picture

more info

Your record for 12th August is interesting as the first Bedfordshire record was on 8th August 2009. Also around the same time there were records of single moths at Stoke Newington and Greenford (Middlesex) and two Essex sites plus at least two Hertfordshire records.

Andy Banthorpe
Joint Macro-moth recorder for Bedfordshire, VC30
www.vc30moths.org.uk