Fenwickfield's picture

Polyporus ciliatus

Observed: 31st March 2012 By: FenwickfieldFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
Polyporus ciliatus
Polyporus ciliatus (2)
Polyporus ciliatus (3)
Polyporus ciliatus (4)
Polyporus ciliatus (5)
Polyporus ciliatus (6)
Polyporus ciliatus (7)
Royoporus badius
Description:

On old cut hardwood timber in open area of woodland.Convex and centrally depressed,wavy with slightly in rolled margins,grey chocolate brown.It does say it can be mistaken for P.brumalis which has larger pores so have gone for Polyporus in case I am wrong have kept a sample if anyone want to have a closer look.

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

jhn7's picture

Incredible find!

What terrific specimens! I'm afraid I've never seen these but they certainly match Polyporus although in Michael Jordan they look more like P tuberaster to me.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

Fenwickfield's picture

kept

I am drying it out and going to send it to the association of British fungi so hopefully I will get a correct id.I had looked at P tuberaster but thought the cap looked smoother and darker but maybe that is just because it is more mature.I have never seen this on before but have had other Polyporus.

Sheila

Fenwickfield

jhn7's picture

Good idea.

I'll keep an eye out for developments!

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

miked's picture

Very nice, will be

Very nice, will be interesting to see what they come up with for ID.

Fenwickfield's picture

no response

I have heard nothing but they say it takes quite a while to get a result.

Fenwickfield

Fenwickfield's picture

new photo and possible id

I have added a photograph of it at a more mature stage I have not yet received a response from my sample posted off to The Association of British Fungi but did get an id from photo's I posted on there website and it was identified as a young Polyporous badius by Andreas Gminder who also said it is now known as Royoporous badius.
Any thought's welcomed

Fenwickfield

jhn7's picture

How confusing!

In Collins Complete Guide it has Polyporus durus = P. badius the Bay Polypore. I know you have seen those http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/109144 and they look quite different to me.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

Fenwickfield's picture

me too

I am also confused Janet I am not sure how much of an expert this person is (but I think they are) as I am new to the site but they all seem to know what there talking about.Then I worry that we don't trust our own judgement as even experts can be wrong sometimes.I think we will just have to wait for the sample result's.I know Mal is on this site so maybe he can help confirm if this person is an expert and what he thinks.

Sheila

Fenwickfield

Fenwickfield's picture

update

I have had a response from an expert Leif Goodwin and he also confirms that it is Polyporus badius but will still wait for results before editing the observation.
Oh why are fungi so hard to identify

Sheila

Fenwickfield

jhn7's picture

Oh help!

I have great admiration for Leif Goodwin and use his site all the time see http://www.leifgoodwin.co.uk/Fungi/Polyporus%20durus.html
however I'm still struggling with this.
As you say the variability within species is mindblowing. I can't wait for the DNA probe Mike has hopes for!!

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

miked's picture

I am also struggling with

I am also struggling with those polyporus, have stuck a couple of observations on and not sure about either of them. Going by the descriptions on his site then http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/256141 might turn out to be Polyporus brumalis, noting the large pores but overall shape/colour is a bit off.
and http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/10539 might be the same species or perhaps p. tuberaster.

miked's picture

"Oh why are fungi so hard to

"Oh why are fungi so hard to identify" There are an awful lot of species and they generally have few good characters that you can use to separate them. Makes most of the other groups of organisms on iSpot look easy.
Wonder how many years it will be before cheap enough DNA methods come along that make fungi easy too, suspect there might be other aspects of fungi that make DNA a bit tricky too.
Perhaps in 10 years time those birdy people will be saying 'why have those fungi lot got it so easy, their mushrooms just sit there and you prod them with a probe and get the ID whereas we have birds flitting off all the time and there are always new species flying to uk with climate change'.