ns2658's picture

Coccinella 7 punctata

Observed: 2nd March 2012 By: ns2658
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - current student
ns2658’s reputation in Invertebratesns2658’s reputation in Invertebrates
Coccinella 7 punctata
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which 7-spot Ladybird (Coccinella septempunctata) interacts

Comments

Peter Pearson's picture

7-Spots

I dont know if its the same where you are, but we have hundreds in N.Essex they have come out of hibernation with the warm spell of late.

ns2658's picture

7-Spots

I was clearing leaves from my mother and fathers garden as they can't really do it themselves anymore. I wouldn't say there were hundreds, but over the course of a couple of hours I saw 20 possibly 30.

Peter Pearson's picture

7-Spot

Please dont image I was over estimating, in fact I counted 50 on Ivy and 40 on a viburnum in the garden. A few miles away from home we have watched litterally hundreds over winter, disappearing into old fence posts in frost and snow, emerging as the sun showed through.I have been recording over many years and have never seen the like.

ns2658's picture

I wasn't for one moment

I wasn't for one moment suggesting that you were over estimating. Just pointing out that I haven't observed those sort of numbers here in Wiltshire. To be fair though I have made no systematic observations. I just happened to casually observe these ones whilst doing something else.

Very interesting. Do you know the reasons why you have so many? Or is that the norm?

Peter Pearson's picture

High numbers of 7-Spots

Every few years we have huge numbers of 7-Spots turn up on the Eaast Coast. The past two years have seen extremely high influxes. In 2010 numbers were so high that red drifts of them were pictured on the local newsreels.
Last year there weren't so many but none the less there were thousands.
My wife and I have been keeping an eye on them over wintering and were surprised how they moved around even in frosty conditions.
Why do they turn up on the East Coast, well the experts tells us that they eat their way to the coast as food runs out inland, it is also said that as the cereal growing area there is plentiful supply of aphids.
However I believe we may be seeing influxes from the continent, after all large numbers of other insect come here by migration, but I am told this cannot be the case. Who knows, one day we will get at the truth.