Jonathan's picture

Ivy broomrape

Observed: 7th July 2009 By: Jonathan
iSpot team
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Ivy broomrape1small
Ivy broomrape3small
Ivy broomrape2small
Description:

Growing in a solid bed of ivy under a turkey oak.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

the naturalist man's picture

Common broomrape

I admit I'm not familiar with broomrapes, I've only seen common broomrape. Refering to Rose & O'Reilly (Wildflower Key) it says common broomrape can be found growing with ivy, parasitising another plant species some distance away.

Your photograph indicates yellowish flowers as with common broomrape; whereas ivy broomrape has cream flowers. Also the flower lobes look rounded rather than pointed as in ivy broomrape.

Graham Banwell

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miked's picture

I did wonder about common

I did wonder about common broomrape but still think its more likely ivy broomrape from the general overall appearance - ivy broomrape tends to be bigger, meatier, more pointed I seem to recall and have a slight pink tinge which this one does. Whereas common broomrape tends to be smaller and go to a flat top sooner.
On the other hand ivy broomrape is much less common and has a rather restricted natural distribution.
Hoping to illustrate the difference I just looked through my uk plant photos, digital and on slide and found that I have pictures of the rarer broomrapes but not common or ivy, even though I have seen them many times! A lesson to photograph common things as well as rare ones, I suspect the real reason why the images are missing is that I photographed both these species many years ago and more recently I threw out the slides as they were not up to standard.

Jonathan's picture

Maybe someone local to

Maybe someone local to Cambridge can go and take a look? The location is accurately recorded on the map.

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

bobthebirder's picture

ivy broomrape

This is the most common species on Portland (Dorset) and here they look exactly like the ones in the photo. The clincher is the observation of the rounded yellow stigma lobes - they are purple in common broomrape. You can just about see this in the photo.

Bob Ford

Jonathan's picture

I find it interesting that

I find it interesting that there is a generalist species (O.minor) and a specialist (O.hederae) that attack the same species (ivy). I just looked at what is known about the molecular phylogeny of Orobanche and these two species do consistently separate out on the evolutionary tree, although the paper says that the taxonomy of the genus is in urgent need of revision.

Park, J. M., Manen, J. F., Colwell, A. E. & Schneeweiss, G. M. (2008) A plastid gene phylogeny of the non-photosynthetic parasitic Orobanche (Orobanchaceae) and related genera. Journal of Plant Research, 121, 365-376.

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

bobthebirder's picture

ivy broomrape

I've just noticed that the original image is fairly high res. If you zoom right in you can see some yellow stigma lobes. So this must be ivy broomrape.

Bob Ford