nightfly's picture

Unidentified insect?

Observed: 1st January 1980 By: nightflynightfly’s reputation in Invertebratesnightfly’s reputation in Invertebratesnightfly’s reputation in Invertebratesnightfly’s reputation in Invertebratesnightfly’s reputation in Invertebrates
River Suir near Golden, Tipp. 3rd July 2010 (91)
River Suir near Golden, Tipp. 3rd July 2010 (91)
River Suir near Golden, Tipp. 3rd July 2010 (92)
River Suir near Golden, Tipp. 3rd July 2010 (93)
Description:

This insect was photographed on a reed growing in the river Suir in Co. Tipperary in July 2010. It is approx. 13/14mm in length. Sorry for the poor quality of the image but it is a crop from a larger photo containing a moth, which was the primary subject in the pic.
Any help IDing this really appreciated, my best guess at this stage is a micro moth of some sort?

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

inopinatus's picture

Not a caddis

Quite sure that it's not a caddisfly. But no idea what it is and would be very interested to find out.

nightfly's picture

Shape wise this thing reminds

Shape wise this thing reminds me of an Alder fly but it is more like the colour of a caddis or moth. I havent looked yet but could it be a relative of the alder fly, some kind of lacewing?

I know its nothing like familiar lacewings which have clear veined wings.

One thing, it scuttled down the reed and out of sight around the other side, quite quickly, it moved like a caddis.

Cathal.

foxy's picture

Been looking in ..

Insects of the New Forest and wondering if it might be a cockroach I"ve never seen one but Lesser Cockroach looks similar in shape I think.

Foxy

nightfly's picture

John, I'm still quite unsure

John,

I'm still quite unsure about this one, I must have a look at Lesser cockroach, at first look it doesnt remind me of what I'm familiar with in the way of cockroaches but maybe what you suggest is quite different?

I should add in as an edit, another pic of it scuttling away around the other side of the reed. Its a poor pic but it reminded me of how it moved and the speed with which it moved out of view, as I said before it moved as a caddis would, briskly.

I'm surprised this one has been so unfamiliar to most so far! Will google that now....

Thanks again,

Cathal.

nightfly's picture

John Bratton, At this point I

John Bratton,

At this point I think trichoptera is the best suggestion so far- this isnt a million miles away from caddis shaped and it did move like one.

Cathal.

John Bratton's picture

I sent the picture to Ian

I sent the picture to Ian Wallace, British caddis expert, and he doesn't think it is one. But he doesn't know what it is either. I think the wings are too opaque to be a spongefly. That really only leaves microlepidoptera that I can think of.

John Bratton

nightfly's picture

Thanks for taking the time

Thanks for taking the time John, I will add in a crop of it scuttling away down the reed. Its a poor shot in fairness but it might result in some ideas.

Thanks,

Cathal.

nightfly's picture

Original pic added in which a

Original pic added in which a Beautiful China Mark was the main subject, plus 2 woeful images of the brown insect departing.

Cathal.

foxy's picture

Microlepidopteran

Hi Cathal, I took liberty of posting a link to this post on the mothsireland forum for their opinion,Eamonn O Donnell thinks Alderfly sp. no one so far thinks micromoth the search for enlightenment goes on...

Foxy

nightfly's picture

Thanks for doing that John,

Thanks for doing that John, I'd agree with Eamonn in regards to the shape of the insect, much like the shape of an alderfly but are there any species with opaque brown wings is the big question?

At present Im leaning towards caddis........but still not sure, this one is a right puzzler.

Cathal.

inopinatus's picture

Chaetopteryx?

In the blurred picture of the insect on its own, it looks very much like the caddis Chaetopteryx villosa - however the image ay just be distorted. I wonder if it has just been caught in a strange pose in the first images. The head may look larger due to blurring of the dense hairs, and it may be in the process of folding its wings, positioning them in an odd shape at the moment the photo was taken.

Chaetopteryx is a notably squat, round-winged caddisfly, with dark bristly hairs all over that have led some observers to nickname it the "flying gooseberry." This would fit in with the caddis-like scuttling behaviour.

nightfly's picture

Thanks for this suggestion

Thanks for this suggestion Inopinatus, must have a look at that species.

Cathal.