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5 Burnet _7207

Observed: 16th June 2011 By: Wildlife Ranger
Freshwater Environment & Ecology Trust
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Description:

Common on red clover

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

ianbeavis's picture

Trifolii or lonicerae

It's worth adding that Z trifolii is a declining species, and if you look at the most recent maps there are no modern records anywhere near Yorkshire.

ophrys's picture

Agreed

I completely agree, but that can also be a dangerous way to start thinking; best to keep an open mind, surely. Take something like the recent discovery of the hoverfly Callicera rufa on sites in southern England, when it had only ever been seen in the highlands of Scotland...

Ian
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Wildlife Ranger's picture

Burnets

Absence of Evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence . Cromwell is a fairy large expance of grassland with extensive Narrow 5 Spots but I have a feeling that along the river path where there is even more numerous Red Clover Trifoli is present.

Perphaps the fact it is under recorded is the difficulty in actiually telling apart.

Having said that I am still looking for the Bilberry Shieldbug :-) and have nt found it

Best Wishes

WLR

Here is a video of Narrow 5

http://youtu.be/jdGKY6LQcG8

WLR

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Martin Harvey's picture

Five-spot increasing in some places

The true Five-spot Burnet was until recently a declining species if not on the verge of extinction in my area (Berkshire/Buckinghamshire) but it is currently making a comeback and thus making the identification of burnets much trickier than it used to be! The 'traditional' links to habitat and foodplant seem to be breaking down as well, not sure about flight periods.

----
Entomologist and biological recorder

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Burnets

Good to Know Martin surely must be a good indicator species of grassland and associated habita in your area

Best Wishes

WLR

Whats Happening with Nature ??? Visit the Nature Blog

http://florafaunauk.blogspot.co.uk/

www.ukwildlife.net

Supporting FEET Conservation work & Biodiversity Recording

http://www.ebid.net/uk/stores/medic1/Natural-History