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Bee-eater

Observed: 30th June 2011 By: Nature girl
Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
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P6300991
Description:

This was the only shot I managed to get of this spider before it disappeared into the grass with its prey. I think the bee might be a Common Carder Bee (Bombus pascuorum).

Identifications
  •  
    Likely ID
    A crab spider (Xysticus sp.)
    Confidence: It might be this.
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Syrphus's picture

The bee is an Andrena sp.,

The bee is an Andrena sp., not Bombus.

M.

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.

Nature girl's picture

Thanks Syrphus

Could you explain why it is an Andrena species please because I'm not sure of the identifying features.

Syrphus's picture

The brush of hairs on the

The brush of hairs on the hind leg tells you it is not Bombus. These and honeybee have a flat expanded +- hairless segment on the back leg for carrying a semi-solid pollen mass, while most solitaries have a mass of long hairs - not always on the back leg - to carry a dry load.

To make it Andrena, it has three submarginal cells and a +- straight basal vein. Sorry to be technical! You are best looking at a diagram for these. In https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/08/Andrena_wing_v..., B= basal vein and sm= the submarginals.

M.

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.

Nature girl's picture

Thanks for the info.

I for some reason thought it was too big/fat to be an Andrena sp. - not sure where I got that idea from! - so it's interesting to know the characteristic features. I'll try not to make that mistake again and perhaps I should invest in a bee guide so I can learn the technical lingo!

Rosie