pirayaguara's picture

Hottentot fig

Observed: 20th January 2012 By: pirayaguarapirayaguara’s reputation in Plantspirayaguara’s reputation in Plantspirayaguara’s reputation in Plantspirayaguara’s reputation in Plants
hottentot fig
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

marlandza's picture

This is not Carpobrotus edulis

and unlike any of the South African Carpobrotus that I've seen - may be a hybrid but take a look at the Australian flower ttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carpobrotus_glaucescens which appears more like yours.

marland-uk
My favourite Lichen Site
MARINE, MARITIME AND OCEANIC LICHENS
'What is not shared is lost'
http://www.lichensmaritimes.org/index.php?lang=en

martinjohnbishop's picture

Keys out as Carpobrotus

Keys out as Carpobrotus glaucescens using Stace 3, the present standard British Flora.

Beagle's picture

Hottentot Fig

According to Rose's Wild Flower Key C.edulis was introduced from S. Africa (native place of origin)and is invasive.Respectfully

Hugh

pirayaguara's picture

It is very invasive here and

It is very invasive here and together with seaside daisy and holm oak has overrun most of the heathland and maritime grasslands on the cliffs - there is some experimental grazing which is very promising as the goats like it - I tried some (it is edible) but found it rather unpleasant its like a mixture of snot and cough medicine.

Interestingly the picture in Rose shows a plant similar to the one I photographed and the text says it can have purple or yellow flowers - I think Marlandza may be right and there could be two or more species

Beagle's picture

Introd (SAfrica)

It was Rose's illustration that caused the comment. Presumably the species originated in S Africa if it was introduced from there or do we have a situation like the Introd Indian Balsam where the best specimens are to be found in the British Isles and not in the Himalayas? Regards

Hugh

pirayaguara's picture

Marianza - who you will note

Marianza - who you will note has a South African domain address - has stated the plant pictured is unlike South African Hottentot Fig - as pictured in the observations and has wondered if it is an Australian species from the same genus or a hybrid with the more typical specimens that also occur in the same area. It is also possible that it is some sort of a cultivar. There was a similar situation id'ing a parrot that had turned up in a garden in Liverpool that looked little like it's wild cousins but it emmerged that captive birds have been selectively bred to make them much brighter than the rather dull wild birds.

In the case of invasive exotics they are sometimes more robust as a result of selective breeding but usually they do so well as a result of the limiting factors, such as extreme conditions or predators, that occur in their natural range not being present where they have been introduced.

Beagle's picture

Zuid Afrika - previously noted

With respect, Marianza states 'This is not Carpobrotus edulis' whereas we are suggesting why it could be C. edulis. Regards

Hugh

pirayaguara's picture

I think it is likely to be a

I think it is likely to be a cultivar of C. edulis

marlandza's picture

Link to Plantzafrica

may help
http://www.plantzafrica.com/plantcd/carpobed.htm

marland-uk
My favourite Lichen Site
MARINE, MARITIME AND OCEANIC LICHENS
'What is not shared is lost'
http://www.lichensmaritimes.org/index.php?lang=en

marlandza's picture

For a traditional use for the fruit:

See Faldela William's book - trust this link works
http://books.google.co.za/books?id=twILUiq8138C&pg=PA64&lpg=PA64&dq=sour...
It did for me, with cut and paste - it's
possible to read the recipe on line.
NOTE: As children we loved to suck and chew the dried fruit (of Carpobrotus edulis) directly off the plants, in the veld. I suppose modern children would be warned to wash the fruit first.

marland-uk
My favourite Lichen Site
MARINE, MARITIME AND OCEANIC LICHENS
'What is not shared is lost'
http://www.lichensmaritimes.org/index.php?lang=en

Beagle's picture

Sour Fig Preserve

Thanks and regards for the link - Faldela Williams' book makes a fascinating website. You might like to browse John Buchan's Richard Hannay stories which also give an insight into the veld.

Hugh

derrick.rowe's picture

Edulis it is not

I agree with marland. Certainly not pure C edulis which has yellow flowers only turning slightly pink as petals are dying.
The beautifully pink-purple flowered C. chilensis is reported as established in England and C. aequilaterus is reported to be naturalised in continental Europe so it is also probably in the UK.
Members of the genus hybridise readily even with Disphyma taxa to the degree that New Zealand's D. australe is threatened as a pure species.
Having lived in Australia, I am familiar with the smaller sub-tropical species C. glaucescens which seems a very unlikely match.

marlandza's picture

Thanks

This may possibly be a hybrid.

marland-uk
My favourite Lichen Site
MARINE, MARITIME AND OCEANIC LICHENS
'What is not shared is lost'
http://www.lichensmaritimes.org/index.php?lang=en

derrick.rowe's picture

The plot thickens.

Another Southern African species C. acinaciformis is widely naturalised in warmer regions of Europe, especially the Mediterranean coasts, so it seems very possible that it too (or one or more of its hybrid swarms) may be in the UK.
Dr Julie Hawkins,of Reading University was given a grant back in 2004 toward researching the DNA of UK Carpobrotus to try an ascertain their parentage.
Email:
j.a.hawkins@reading.ac.uk
Incidentally, C. aequilaterus is a dubious taxon.

marlandza's picture

Yes, that's more likely

I just didn't want to leave an obviously incorrect ID on the site, where the incorrect agreements are still ruling.
Julie Hawkings would really enjoy making contact with Priscilla Burgoyne the SA expert on these plants. See Prix Burgoyne on SA iSpot
http://www.ispot.org.za/latest_obs_grid_view?group_nid%5B%5D=7&uid_1=Pri...
takes you to her observations - I'm sure you'd be able to refine the filter.

marland-uk
My favourite Lichen Site
MARINE, MARITIME AND OCEANIC LICHENS
'What is not shared is lost'
http://www.lichensmaritimes.org/index.php?lang=en

marlandza's picture

An interesting link to iSpot ZA

http://www.ispot.org.za/node/178245
then check the thumbnails below.

marland-uk
My favourite Lichen Site
MARINE, MARITIME AND OCEANIC LICHENS
'What is not shared is lost'
http://www.lichensmaritimes.org/index.php?lang=en