nightfly's picture

Unknown fungus.

Observed: 20th November 2011 By: nightflynightfly’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
20 Nov 11 (5)
20 Nov 11 (3)
Description:
Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Fenwickfield's picture

Scientific name

You need to put the genus down too which is Hygrocybe if you do then I can agree,rather hard to say which as more information is needed about it.

Fenwickfield

nightfly's picture

Thanks Fenwickfield, will do,

Thanks Fenwickfield,

will do, what kind of info would be helpful?

Cheers,

Cathal.

Martincito's picture

There is a key to Waxcaps

There is a key to Waxcaps here: http://www.aber.ac.uk/waxcap/what/key-main.shtml

Sort of info it needs include was the cap and/or stem slimy, was the cap smooth or scaly etc, how did the gills join the stem eg decurrent with the gills running down the stem a bit (a photo of underside could be a good way of showing this), any unusual smell eg of garlic, etc...

nightfly's picture

Ok thanks for the info and

Ok thanks for the info and link Martincito, I get the idea, a lot of familiarisation seems necessary!

I'm afraid I didnt look so closely, its possibly still there.

Thanks,

Cathal.

Martincito's picture

I'm not at all sure that this

I'm not at all sure that this is Hygrocybe pratensis... the gills and stem don't look pale enough and there is no sign of the gills being decurrent. Info from: http://www.rogersmushrooms.com/gallery/DisplayBlock~bid~6154.asp
Interestingly Roger Philips has the name as Cuphophyllus pratensis..

Fenwickfield's picture

Cannot ve.emery

I is not possible to give a definite id on this that is why I suggested that Genus only should be put on.This is a rather mature specimen and they can look so different from newly emerged or young ones.I also feel that if there is no information about smell,if sticky,dry,rough ect and a cross section then you can only go by Genus,Martincito has also given these reason's so I presume that you have not read the comments section.

Fenwickfield

ve.emery's picture

I missed the comments that

I missed the comments that you had made be not scrolling down the page enough. I agree with what you said including with hindsight the not very decurrent gills.

nightfly's picture

I'm afraid I didnt know to

I'm afraid I didnt know to collect the relevent info for the purposes of IDing, but I will try to be more detailed in future.

Cathal.

Martincito's picture

No problem!

No problem Cathal, I think we have all been surprised how every little detail is needed to identify even very distinctive-looking fungi - and even then some of them remain a mystery. I think it is because of the variations within a given species... happy hunting anyway, and I look forward to seeing your observations in the future. Happy New Tear!

nightfly's picture

Thanks Martincito, When I

Thanks Martincito,

When I encountered this fungus, I was hurrying back to the car due to a downturn in the weather, but I couldnt go past this without getting a photo.

As regards getting underneath pics, is it normal to have to uproot fungi in order to get the necessray details in a photo?

Happy New Year to you also,

Cathal.

Martincito's picture

I usually pick one nice

I usually pick one nice looking mushroom and gently free it from the substrate, take some photos of its gills, stem, any bulb at the end of the stem, etc, give it a good sniff (though they all seem to smell like mushrooms to my rather insensitive nose), then wrap it in tissue, put in an envelope and take it home where I put the cap on a sheet of paper with a an upturned bowl or whatever over it in the hope that the spores will come out overnight and leave a nice spore print so I know what colour the spores are and maybe even admire them under a microscope. Taking a mushroom isn't like taking a plant... it is more like picking a flower. The body of the fungus is buried in the substrate and sends up the mushrooms when the conditions are right for launching some spores. Taking one doesn't due it any great harm. I think the norm among mushroom enthusiasts (of which I'm a rather inexperienced example) is to leave any specially rare one if it is growing on its own (though that presupposes that you recognise it as such) and otherwise just take a specimen or two for further study. The idea is not to harvest the entire crop to make omelettes, which is very risky anyway in my humble opinion due to the toxic nature of so many and the difficulty of recognising them.

nightfly's picture

Thanks for all this

Thanks for all this information Martincito, I think I'd probably only decide to pull one up for photos or to take home if there were a number of specimens there, the one above seemed to be all on its own.

Thank you,

Cathal.

Martincito's picture

Good decision. I personally

Good decision. I personally draw the line at bringing insects home for closer examination, not to mention dissection!!

Martincito's picture

Your mushroom looks a bit

Your mushroom looks a bit like these: http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/243031, doesn't it?