moremoth's picture

Wall barley, Hordeum murinum.

Observed: 8th June 2011 By: moremothmoremoth’s reputation in Plantsmoremoth’s reputation in Plantsmoremoth’s reputation in Plantsmoremoth’s reputation in Plantsmoremoth’s reputation in Plants
Wall barley, Hordeum murinum.
Description:

Grass with many spiky awns in a compact head that readily comes apart, growing by the roadside.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Wall Barley (Hordeum murinum) interacts

Comments

cicuta58's picture

Hordeum jubatum..

has much longer awns and is altogether more silky-looking (and attractive). H. murinum often grows on roadsides.

cicuta58

cabbageleek's picture

I wouldn't say they are much

I wouldn't say they are much longer than the ones in the photograph. Also, the heads of Hordeum jubatum tends to droop like those in the photo.
I'm not saying it is Hordeum jubatum, just that you can't be sure from this photo.

Ray Arigho's picture

Hordeum murinum

That's a fine photograph of H. murinum. Can't tell if it's ssp. murinum, ssp. glaucum or ssp. leporinum but it never could be H. jubatum.

Rachy Ramone's picture

It would help us non-grass-experts...

...if you could explain why, please?

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

lavateraguy's picture

Cicuta58 has ...

... succinctly summarised the differences.

As a grass non-expert I didn't have any great difficulty when I found my first Hordeum jubatum late last autumn, though I sent a photograph off to the VC recorder for confirmation.

Around here Hordeum murinum is reasonably common as an urban weed.

I'm more worried about confusing Hordeum murinum and Hordeum marinum.

Rachy Ramone's picture

Cicuta58 summarised, but...

...I was asking Ray as he seemed so very positive: often this means that someone has a clear way of distinguishing between items.

Ray has now answered (below), so thanks to both he and Graeme.

I really don't enjoy grasses...

Rachy Ramone

How to take close-ups with cheap phone and hand-lens:
http://tree-and-shrub-id.blogspot.co.uk/p/how-to-close-ups.html
Field Guides for Budding Botanists:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B01A8YB0WY

Ray Arigho's picture

H. murinum v. H. jubatum - The Mane Event

The spikelets of Hordeum are in a clusters of three. One fertile spikelet and two sterile spikelets. All spikelets have two lower bracts (glumes) and one upper bract (lemma). The glumes are subulate (tapering to a point, awl-like) and the lemmas have a
bristle (awn) at the tip.

All measurements below are upper limits.

In Hordeum murinum:
Glumes 30mm
Lemma awns 40mm

In Hordeum jubatum:
Glumes 80mm
Lemma awns 80mm

As numbers, this may not mean a lot, but when viewed there is a marked difference in appearance between the inflorescences. The longer glumes and awns of Hordeum jubatum give the inflorescence a mane-like appearance (the specific epithet 'jubatum' means 'long-haired', 'mane-like'). That is what is lacking in the above photograph.

Admittedly, H. murinum at its upper limits and H. jubatum at its lower limits (glumes and lemma awns 35mm) may cause confusion and a wrong determination.
Not a hanging offence yet and certainly nothing to lose sleep over.

Google images has still got some good examples of both taxa among the clutter.

H.jubatum could be confused with some of the smaller Stipa spp.

I sincerely hope that helps a bit Rachy Ramone.

Edited for wrong spelling of inflorescence.