Shadow30's picture

Good news for many

I am pleased to say that I believe that I have finished submitting my historic images.
Many of these have been of dubious quality, and I would like give my heartfelt thanks to those who have nevertheless attempted id.

I will, of course, attempt to provide more helpful images in future.

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Comments

ophrys's picture

Good news

It's been quite entertaining, to be honest. They have ranged from the impossible to ID(truly impossible!!) to the excellent, but have always provided a chance to think about identifications. Hope we get plenty more in the future (and in focus!)!

;)

Ian
_________________

My Flickr photos...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/52163027@N02/

Fenwickfield's picture

Agreed

I agree it has kept me out of mischief for the past couple of weeks and I to have enjoyed trying to test my rusty plant skills.I must say I am looking forward to photo's in focus and if you take them of fungi remember shots of the gills and stem too.I look forward to your 2012 photos shadow.

Fenwickfield

Ray Turner's picture

Echo ...

... all of the above; particularly enjoyed the East African birds, don’t get enough of them on here IMHO (controversial me?! ;-) )

Ray

Ray

Refugee's picture

Observations in Africa

There is a site now for Africa and while there are not too many observations there it goes quite fast.
Perhaps we could try and get all those African observations on there so that they are all in one place.

http://za.ispot.org.uk/

Refugee

Shadow30's picture

Africa

Not sure whether it covers East Africa though

John

Refugee's picture

Closer

I was thinking along the lines of it being closer to the observation than here in the UK.
It is also new and needs more input to get it going.

Refugee

Shadow30's picture

Africa

Were you suggesting that ISPOT administrators transfer them en bloc, or that individuals re-submit?

John

Refugee's picture

New ones

I was thinking along the lines of encouraging users to post further African observations on the new site and to leave what we have already got alone. I have a feeling that the team are working on a filter and am hoping they will offer a link if the location is in Africa at the time of posting.

Refugee

Ray Turner's picture

Personally ...

... I feel the best approach is to post all observations on one central site with adequate filters so that users can then tailor what they see, much the same way as we currently separate groups now.

My own use of this would then be to include everything as a norm, only applying a filter if a plethora of observations arose from an area I know little about, say South America in my case. I quite like the challenge of seeing new stuff occasionally and a SA raptor will get me delving into the textbooks, though 50 observations of blurred seagulls would have me clicking the filter I must admit.

The alternative is to have numerous sites, one for every country or region eventually and this feels wrong to me. I think we will be the poorer if we confine what we see strictly to the UK.

I notice that I have to register as a new user for the SA site; I don’t want that, I am an iSpot user and as such at the very most I want to click on a tab/link from within iSpot that takes me to another page of the site.

Ray

Ray

miked's picture

The plan is to amalgamate the

The plan is to amalgamate the SA site and the main ispot site at some stage in the future so DO NOT try to move observations or duplicate them. The South Africa site covers South Africa not the whole of africa (but it will accept observations from anywhere just like the UK site), on the other hand they do have people there with more expertise of african wildlife in general. Up to you which site you submit your observation to but best not to duplicate the observations. They have fewer observations and fewer users than on the main UK site but they have not been running for very long.

Refugee's picture

Link

The link i was thinking of is one with a suggestion that the user signs up to the Africa site and posts there instead of here for all the above reasons.
It is just more likely that there are others there whom have seen the organisms with there own eyes so that they would be able to give a more positive ID.

Refugee