MatthewGirling's picture

Photo dumping

Would it be a good idea to limit how many spots a user can upload in one day? Quite often a new user will upload over 10 images all in one go and they are not good pics for IDing.

If they had only uploaded 1 or 2 then they would receive feedback. (Like: "can we have a close up?" or "There's 2 plants in that shot") and then future pics would be better.

Can I suggest a limit of 5 or 6 pics a day until more experience has been acquired?

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Jonathan's picture

Interesting suggestion, but

Interesting suggestion, but not all new users do this. We'd rather not discourage people, especially beginners .

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

DavidHowdon's picture

Tend to agree here

One of the nice things about iSpot is how welcoming it is when you join and how few rules it imposes.

The price for that is that occasionally we might get a large number of pictures dumped but it is infrequent enough an occurance that to me it seems a price worth paying for inclusiveness.

I wonder if adding something to the Help file about what is particularly desirable. For instance (after discussions early on about what was wanted) I tend to upload things to iSpot if a) I need an ID confirmed, b) they show something not yet on iSpot, c) they show a particularly relevant ID feature of something in a useful way. If that sort of thing is what iSpot wants then encouraging people to do it is a good idea.

Refugee's picture

I am selective

I will put stuff on if there are not very many good in focus images on here or if i just have no idea what it is. I have put the odd blurred one on when it has been raining and it was a threat to the camera.
I have found one or two extra large specimens of common fungi this year and have put them on for just that reason. Also attracted by the sound i found some drone flies searching for winter retreats in a cave. Another one was a ladybird drinking hog-weed sap with such determination that it was sparing with wasps to get to it.
I will wait and see if there is a slack time before the spring and put up the best of the rest of the common ones i have got as long as they are in focus.

Refugee

Ray Turner's picture

My understanding ...

... is iSpot is also a mapping tool (hence the new feature), this only works if we upload observations for a given area. For this reason I will upload a species, even if it’s common e.g. Grey Squirrel, if it’s from a new location to me.

This the leads naturally to a time function, so should we therefore load observation according to season, year etc? I think so, it is not sufficient simply to know the species was present at a given time.

Ray

Ray

DavidHowdon's picture

Mapping tool

I'm not sure I would see iSpot as a "mapping tool", rather it is a tool for helping with wildlife identification which has a map / geographical search as one way of getting into that data.

Ray Turner's picture

Premature

I may have been a bit premature using is, my understanding being it is one of the long term aims of iSpot.

Either way if we don’t post observations of the mundane and frequently (as well as the rare and exiting) any mapping function is irrelevant.

Ray

Ray

MatthewGirling's picture

Mapping

The mapping is an important part to me too. Can someone tell me if iSpot obs get added to the NBN maps or are they just there for reference?

Matthew

Jonathan's picture

iSpot data are starting to

iSpot data are starting to find their way to NBN and we have supplied data for locations where particular species have not been recorded before.

The route is via the relevant recording scheme, so that the data can be checked and validated before going to NBN.

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

DavidHowdon's picture

Duplication

Must admit I slightly worry about iSpot submitting data. I submit my own data to the relevant recording scheme, typically (especially if it is an 'interesting' record) with more accurate location information, acknolwedgement of the efforts of other recorders involved and often other relevant information.

If iSpot submits the data the risk of duplication of slightly different versions of the same records arises.

I suspect the advantages of the extra records from those who do not submit is thought to out-weigh the risk of confusion around the records of those of us who already do.

Jonathan's picture

It only goes through experts

It only goes through experts and recorders. iSpot does not submit direct and will not do so, in part for the reason that you say.

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

Matt Smith's picture

Records

As a person who helps run a Recording Scheme, I'd much rather have a duplicate record for "xxx @ yyy" than none at all - it is easy to filter out duplicate or "near duplicate" records at this end. All the records I have obtained via I-Spot are tagged with an I-spot identifier as well, so i can easily trace the source.

As for the NBN, if you look at some records you will see the same record mapped several times as it makes its way onto the NBN via different routes (eg Recording Scheme & Local Record Centre & SNCO).

Tachinid Recording Scheme

www.tachinidae.org.uk

TRS Facebook Page
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Tachinid-Recording-Scheme/376652392364707