Fenwickfield's picture

3rd December 2011 035

Observed: 3rd December 2011 By: FenwickfieldFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
Big Boletus
Big Boletus (2)
Big Boletus (3)
Big Boletus (4)
Big Boletus (5)
Big Boletus (6)
Big Boletus (7)
Description:

Solitary under Pine very big closest I could get was Boletus aestivalis,flesh white firm and unchanging cap dull brown quite has been nibbled by something.I have seen the common name so my confidence is a might seeing it was December

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Cep (Boletus edulis) interacts

Comments

miked's picture

What about B. pinophilus, if

What about B. pinophilus, if you look it does have a white net and a more reddish hint to stem and was under pine and this species can be very late in season. cap looks a bit brown for this species but rest fits and not sure if they can have brown rather than reddish brown cap

flaxton's picture

I find it easier to agree

I find it easier to agree with those mycologists who say B pinophilus is probably just a variety of B edulis. The identifying "features" are the colour variations in the cap and stipe surface and with a past its' best specimen this becomes a real lottery.
Mal

miked's picture

http://static.msi.umn.edu/rre

http://static.msi.umn.edu/rreports/2010/211.pdf
I don't agree that B. pinophilus is just a variety of B. edulis, from my rather limited experience they look quite different and often occur in different conditions. However from the paper quoted above its clear that the whole of the group containing B. edulis and B. pinophilus and a couple of other species is in a bit of a mess and might only be sorted out with more world-wide molecular sampling. Most of research has been done on samples collected in Europe and north america but the distribution of these species is much wider than that so possibly a lot of the variation within the species is being missed.

flaxton's picture

Interesting article which I

Interesting article which I think will need some study. I have never been confident in splitting the edulis betulicola pinophilus aereus reticulatus group with almost no discernible microscopic differences. The variable "edulis" I have found have almost certainly included some of the above.