sparky's picture

Blue Tit fledgling

Observed: 23rd May 2011 By: sparkysparky’s reputation in Birdssparky’s reputation in Birdssparky’s reputation in Birds
Blue Tit fledgling
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) interacts

Comments

Fenwickfield's picture

How exciting

Did you rear it or did it just come in the house,very nice to see one that close,seem's to have been a good year for them.

Fenwickfield

ophrys's picture

Good year

Interesting that you say that, as I think the complete opposite is true, here! I am ringing very few young blue Tits compared to normal. There was some wet weather in May, which I think may have led to a lot of failures round here (Vale of York). That is only a feeling at the moment, continued ringing will maybe tell more, and of course it could easily be very different where you are. I hope you are right, and I am wrong!

Ian
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Fenwickfield's picture

Sticks

I am out in the sticks but put up 15 boxes in various places were I live 12 were taken by blue tits and three with coal tits.I feed the birds and my garden is wildlife orientated also no cats for miles.There have always been a lot here but it seen's to be more than usual with the Blur Tits,Coal Tits,Great Tits and Goldfinches there is no ringing programmes in my area(Northumberland N.W of Hexham area

Fenwickfield

ophrys's picture

Boxes

Well done...your boxes will greatly help the local population, and you get the benefit of seeing the broods fledge.

As for no cats...if only! Inundated with them round here; they really are a massive problem, especially when trying to ring birds.

Ian
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browntrumpet's picture

Tits fledging

You may get to see them fledge if your an early bird.
I've only seen it once in my life and they certainly seem to leave the vicinity very quickly.

sparky's picture

Part of a nestbox-reared

Part of a nestbox-reared brood of around 6 - spent most of the afternoon keeping them away from the neighbours cat and out of the house!

sparky's picture

Blue Tit population

I agree we all need to be supplementing the natural habitat with nestboxes - we have many 'charms' of goldfinches which are particularly attracted to the seed from a large mature larch tree in the garden. I have certainly seen fewer Blue Tits in Derbyshire this year - maybe the populations have been affected by the harsh 2 winters?

ophrys's picture

Low numbers

I have now heard of quite a few ringers who back up what I said earlier about this being a bad year for Blue Tits. Several people are catching very few young birds at all, compared to normal. Plenty of adults, but few youngsters, so something has affected their breeding, or at least the survival of the young birds. Some people report the broods fledging okay, but perhaps not surviving long beyond that stage. That could relate to a shortage of food due to bad weather...ie wet or very dry, I suppose.

Ian
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Fenwickfield's picture

Ringing

How do you get the ringers to come to your area or do they just stay in the same spot's all the time.I will start to make records of mine when they start nesting again in the spring but it would be nice to know how many of mine are this years fledglings and I would love someone to do ringing in my area.The weather here has not been bad and I have had a lot of sawfly and caterpillar larva this summer but I encourage it and there are no chemical sprays used plus unmanaged woodland and unimproved pasture.

Fenwickfield

ophrys's picture

Ringing

I am a ringer myself, so am ringing my own birds, but I have heard from ringers in other areas who are experiencing the same thing...a lack of young Blue Tits.

Without catching them, it is not easy to see the difference between a young one and an adult; if you get a view of the primary coverts, adults have them blue, young birds have them dull greyish green/blue. The following article on ageing birds is very useful and has an example of what I am saying about Blue Tits, if you scroll down. It might help you to see whether your birds are old or young...

http://www.birdguides.com/webzine/article.asp?print=1&a=2544

Ian
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Ray Turner's picture

Thanks

Very nice article Ophrys, thanks for the link.

Ray

Ray

Fenwickfield's picture

Saved it

I have saved it on my favourites very useful will now be watching more closely.

Fenwickfield