Bernie's picture

Faeces found in garden 22 Nov 2011

Observed: 22nd November 2011 By: Bernie
Faeces found in garden 22 Nov 2011
Description:

Not very good photo, dull day in my garden and just had mobile phone.
Saw it on the top of my shed, so presume something that can climb - unless something flying past?
Some trees near us, but mostly arable farmland all around us. Drainage ditches around area so mink, etc around as well. One or two grey squirrels; weasels, stoats etc around the place. Perhaps could be some type of bird, but wouldn't think so?

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Bernie's picture

faeces on shed roof

Looking on the internet, I am now thinking it could be pheasant or partridge?

Bernie, Lincolnshire

the naturalist man's picture

Cat droppings

Bird droppings would have white Uric acid streaks and be 'grainy' and crumbly because of the undigestible seed husks etc. of their food. Wild carnivores would have obvious fur and bones showing; this is the dropping of a domesticated animal feeding on canned food (no, I can't tell which brand! ... not without sniffing and tasting it anyway!) because of the solid, smooth and uniform look of the faeces.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411

Bernie's picture

I would have thought a cat

I would have thought a cat usually likes to go to where the ground has soft earth or vegetation to try and cover it up, and they tend to like a bit of privacy - whereas this was just sitting on the roof (on roofing felt) of my 10' x 10'shed - though on saying that, there are quite a few cats of varying ages around the area too - and perhaps if a teenage kitten was up there and got 'caught short'...., it could well be cat. Thanks

Bernie, Lincolnshire

wek6's picture

Faeces

I have found that not all cats will cover their faeces. Especially if you have a number of Toms in the area, they will leave it in a prominant position to claim their territory.