j.g.medot's picture

Strange yellow goo

Observed: 15th May 2004 By: j.g.medot
Yellow Goo
Description:

The photograph describes all and the grass provides a scale and the location at ground level. The grass was at the side of a fairly large track in woodland, but in an area with no immediate tree cover. This photograph was taken at the start of a walk and on returning, some time later, at least 70% of the 'goo' had gone. There was an enormous slug in attendance, but I can't say if it was a guilty party.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Syrphus's picture

... or being yellow rather

... or being yellow rather than white, is it Fuligo septica or similar?

M.

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.

ktmartin's picture

Slime moulds can move

Maybe it shuffled off!?!

Syrphus's picture

I am no expert on

I am no expert on slime-moulds, so I ask (from a standpoint of relative ignorance) any of those who have voted for Mucilago - what makes this Mucilago rather than Fuligo?

The colour seems to me to point to the latter, but if there is something in the pic that contradicts this, please tell me for future reference.

M.

(To the poster - you should edit to place it in Fungi, where the experts may have a better chance of seeing it. 'My spot', 'Observations', find this one, 'Edit', and select from the drop-down list.)

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.

Wildlife Ranger's picture

The Changing Face of Slime mould - Mucilago crustacea

A common slime mould which starts life as an amorphous creamy-white plasmodium, the surface crystalising with maturity.Mucilago crustacea ;develops into a fruiting body which matures through yellow to become white, its interior finally blackening with age: "the newly emerged plasmodia resemble dogs' vomit on the grass but within 24 hours the calcareous cortex has hardened and the black spore mass has matured" [Bruce Ing, "The Myxomycetes of Britain and Ireland - An Identification Handbook"]

The most reliable absolute are the Spores

HTH

WLR

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Syrphus's picture

Quite so, but in the absence

Quite so, but in the absence of spores how can you exclude Fuligo, which is this deep yellow colour, and give the certain ID that you have?

I don't know whether it is Fuligo or Mucilago, but I would like to be educated. And if the current ID is suspect, it should be revised - either in certainty (with some reason visible in the pic for choosing one rather than the other), or to a higher taxon of which we can be sure.

M.

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.

Martincito's picture

I've removed my agreement to

I've removed my agreement to M. crustacea because I'm not "as sure as I can be" that it's correct. I've added "It might be" IDs as Fuligo and Mucilago. I hope this doesn't seem impolite; it certainly isn't intended to be, rather it reflect my (increasingly uncertain) ideas about what this is. On reflection, and if I was a betting man, I'd put my sixpence on F. septica, but I'm not!

Syrphus's picture

Maybe not a betting man, but

Maybe not a betting man, but hedging your bets! ;-).

I await developments. As long as it stays in '?' it will never get a 'Likely ID', and all the guesses will have equal status.

M.

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Differentiating Slime Moulds

Based on likely Habitat & experience with Texture I would say it is Mucilago crustacea ( Fuligo septans is more often found on decaying leaf mould and chippings ) You could go on very considerably to note spore colour measure size , stain and react spores to reagents etc but this is a Field observation and sadly can be nothing more.

Extract Stephenson and Stempen, Spores black in mass, blackish brown or occasionally bright purplish brown by transmitted light, densely and unevenly verrucose or spiulose, 11 to 13 micrometers in diameter

From Stephenson + Stempen, (Fuligo)
Fuligo septica, Spores dark gray or dull black in the mass, light purplish brown by transmitted light, nearly smoothe to minutely spinulose 6 to 9 micrometers in diameter.

Murdo is correct to be pedantic , I dont do many fungi ID's on i-spot as I often think Spore prints and other examinations are needed and of all the categories on the site there are probably more uncertainties in that category ( Not wanting to offend Expert Mycologists) Mucilago crustacea is more common than fuligo but that is not a reliable diagnostic in itself. Myxomycetes are not Fungi and can be a difficult call. I tend to "do" them with Pollens using a scope if absolute beyond doubt ID is required

Underlying substrate and likeliehood of being more common are contributing factors to the observation but by no means absolute

Based on the information a large dollop of experience "I am as sure as I can be ", - you of course do not have to agree,

HTH

Best Wishes

WLR

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Martincito's picture

It would be so educational if

It would be so educational if we all could provide this sort of justification for an ID!

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Yep

I agree Martin , I sometimes wonder how I get there myself :-) I also think evry poster should be obliged to give a little insight to help those who are starting or interested in nature

Best wishes

WLR

Whats Happening with Nature ??? Visit the Nature Blog

http://florafaunauk.blogspot.co.uk/

www.ukwildlife.net

Supporting FEET Conservation work & Biodiversity Recording

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Wildlife Ranger's picture

erro

erro

Whats Happening with Nature ??? Visit the Nature Blog

http://florafaunauk.blogspot.co.uk/

www.ukwildlife.net

Supporting FEET Conservation work & Biodiversity Recording

http://www.ebid.net/uk/stores/medic1/Natural-History