Lucy Corrander's picture

LADYBIRD. (WITH LARVAE?)

Observed: 6th November 2011 By: Lucy CorranderLucy Corrander’s reputation in InvertebratesLucy Corrander’s reputation in InvertebratesLucy Corrander’s reputation in Invertebrates
LUCY CORRANDER - NOVEMBER 6TH 2011 - IMG_0802
Description:

Ladybird and what I take to be pupae at different stages. Sitting on adjacent leaves on ivy.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Harlequin Ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) interacts

Comments

Lucy Corrander's picture

re. possible Harlequin ID

Folks - I was thinking Harlequins are bigger than traditional ladybirds but this wasn't in the least bit over-sized. If it is a Harlequin, presumably the idea is that it's a young one and will grow?

Blog - Loose and Leafy - http://looseandleafy.blogspot.com/

rimo's picture

Yes, Harlequins - pic 2 is an

Yes, Harlequins - pic 2 is an adult of form succinea, pic 3 is an unhatched pupa, and 4 & 5 show the empty skins of hatched pupae.

Ladybirds are beetles, so have a 4-stage lifecycle like butterflies, and only the larva (the caterpillar-equivalent) will grow. The adults vary in size between 5.5 and 8.5 mm long, so overlap with our larger native species, such as the 7-spot, Eyed, Striped & 13-spot ladybirds. However, the majority of our native species are less than 5mm long, so are much smaller than the Harlequin.

Record your ladybird sightings!
www.harlequin-survey.org
www.ladybird-survey.org

Lucy Corrander's picture

Harmonia axyridis

Thanks for your comments about the Harmonia axyridis photos and for confirmation of ID, Rimo.

I will send the photos to the Ladybird/Harlequin survey sites.

I'm now trying to work out what succinea means. I tried googling it but mostly found snails. It is used with reference to Harlequins in a couple of places but I still couldn't work out what succinea means. Sorry not to know already!

Blog - Loose and Leafy - http://looseandleafy.blogspot.com/

rimo's picture

Never be afraid to ask what

Never be afraid to ask what you don't know for sure! Succinea derives originally from the Latin word succineus, meaning amber. It's the name of this form of the Harlequin (orange with black spots), and refers to the base colour of the elytra (to distinguish it from the melanic forms spectabilis and conspicua).

The snail references that you'll find are to the amber snails, genus Succinea, family succineidae - the name derives from the same Latin root, as shown by the common name!

Record your ladybird sightings!
www.harlequin-survey.org
www.ladybird-survey.org

Lucy Corrander's picture

To Rimo

Thanks for explanation of succinea!

Lucy

Blog - Loose and Leafy - http://looseandleafy.blogspot.com/