vc40's picture

PICT0007c

Observed: 6th December 2011 By: vc40
PICT0007c
PICT0007c 1
Bug 1 2098-2 copy
Description:

unknown ?? its 3 to 4 mm long by 1.5-2 mm wide .... found on suspended on underside of privet plant leaf
Have since found another in a patio oleander in the same tub was Scabious which was in my garden long before the privet was purchased & in different parts of the garden,I assume that the garden is the source of these. but i still have no idea to its identity. Note > what appears to be silk threads attached to one end the other was attached to the leaf suspending the object.the second one was loose on the surface of the scabious leaf. difficult to take pics due to size.I will attempt more pics when better lenses arrive.
Any suggestions welcome .Thanks

Identifications
  • possibly carnation tortrix (Tortrix spp)
    Confidence: It's likely to be this, but I can't be certain.
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

guernseyjoe's picture

could be small butterfly/moth

could be small butterfly/moth pupae orpossibly insect egg?

guernseyjoe's picture

could be small butterfly/moth

could be small butterfly/moth pupae orpossibly insect egg?

Martin Harvey's picture

Nemophora metallica????

I asked Ian Sims to look at this one, and he says:

"This is indeed very odd. I don't think it is a tortrix. Doesn’t look like a psychid either. More likely to be a coleophorid in a seed, but as to which one I would not like to say. I suggest keeping them over-winter, in an old stocking (knotted to prevent earwigs etc. getting in) and hung/pinned to a garden fence (west or SW facing purported to be best). Bring in in late April/May next year and see what comes of them. Also useful to see if there are any more, as chances of getting anything from just 2 are slim. If any larva “pokes its head out” it may be an idea to try and get a picture of it, as thoracic plates etc. can help with IDing with the coleophorids."

Prompted by Ian's suggestions I searched a bit further. A Google search for "scabious seeds" produced this image, which does look rather like your specimen, although yours has dried out and become more ridged:
http://www.allposters.co.uk/-sp/Scabious-Seeds-Posters_i6014054_.htm

but I'm not sure which type of scabious the above image represents.

There is a micro-moth that has larvae in scabious seeds: Nemophora metallica. There are some not very good illustrations here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nemophora_metallica

So if I had to make a guess I would say Nemophora metallica, but I doubt that can be confirmed without rearing them through. The other problem with this guess is that this moth is supposed to be confined to the south of England, not sure whether it's likely in your part of the world, so I'm reluctant to add this as a identification.

At this time of year I think it is likely that any larva that was in the seed will have moved on - N. metallica constructs a small case from leaf fragments once it leaves the seed. But if there is evidence of a larva still in the seed it's certainly worth trying to rear it.

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Entomologist and biological recorder

vc40's picture

Latest Picture at X3 Thanks

Latest Picture at X3 Thanks go to Reg Fry for his help in taking it.I will try to breed it through.& post a final picture of the outcome. Thanks Goes to those that have replied..

Tony Vc40

DavidNotton's picture

Seed

I think this is a seed, suggest transferring to plant group

vc40's picture

Thanks David .Your thoughts

Thanks David .Your thoughts were noted ,& infact prooved today,While in the Garden I saw 15 or more of these hung from a few of my potted plants.I set about with the camera.to record more. i then looked for a plant that expels seed,I came across a self seeded cranesbill i had left in among my other wildflower border, and there they were lots of them on it in the seed pods. so now all i have to do is Id the plant ....
Post finished..Thanks all

Martin Harvey's picture

plant

Thanks for following up on this story, good to know the outcome.

Could you edit this observation so that it appears in Plants rather than Invertebrates - just click on "Edit" towards the top of this page.

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Entomologist and biological recorder