Martincito's picture

Mycena???

Observed: 29th October 2011 By: MartincitoMartincito’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMartincito’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMartincito’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMartincito’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
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Description:

Large group of small white mushrooms growing in wet well-drained grass, cap about 15 mm across, white/grey slightly cream at centre, radial wrinkles near margin, stem translucent white/grey, cap cone/bell-shaped, opening out like umbrella, gills visible below cap in side-view, white, widely-spaced, free/adnexed? Spore print didn't come out.

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Martincito's picture

Thanks for the ID flaxton. M.

Thanks for the ID flaxton. M. flavoalba was on my list of possibles, but doesn't it prefer to grow in the woods?

flaxton's picture

The books say it prefers

The books say it prefers woodland but I have found it both inside woodlands and in grassland.
Most of the gill shots do seem to be pure white but looking closely at one of the pictures it might show a slight yellow edge to the gills. If that is not an illusion then M flavescens is more likely. (which does prefer grassland)

AlanS's picture

A lot

A lot of M. luteoalba in damp, acid grasslands up here at the moment.

Alan

flaxton's picture

Alan What distinguishes

Alan
What distinguishes luteoalba from flavoalba?

AlanS's picture

Nothing

As Martincito has said, Mycena luteoalba is simply the current name for what has long been known as M. flavoalba, according to the Basidiomycete checklist.

From information therein, the name change appears to be correct, and since James Bolton, original author of 'Agaricus luteoalbus' was British, we can also be patriotic about it.