timmy tiptoes's picture

Pholiota Fungus

Observed: 16th October 2011 By: timmy tiptoes
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - current student
timmy tiptoes’s reputation in Fungi and Lichenstimmy tiptoes’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
GEDC0588
GEDC0588 1
GEDC0588 1 2
Description:

A lot of orangey fungus growing around the base of a beech tree near the River Fowey at Golitha Falls, Cornwall. They varied in size; 3 to 10 cm. across; shape from almost conical to just convex and then flattish stem length dependent on position on tree but about 5-15 cm. Cap and stem covered in raised brown scales. Gills khaki/pale brown.

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

flaxton's picture

P aurivella is less scaly and

P aurivella is less scaly and has a sticky cap so I think you are right with your first choice.

timmy tiptoes's picture

Pholiota ID

Thanks very much - that's helpful as P.aurivella was not in my book and was a guess from a web search!

Fenwickfield's picture

Usefull

When you think you know what it is through your books it is useful to put the name into Google and you can then compare more images.I find they are helpful as they are usually at different stages of growth so help you decide with the ID,also spore prints help too.

Fenwickfield

timmy tiptoes's picture

Usefull

Thanks very much - have Googled some but sometimes find that adds to the confusion as so many fungi look alike, but as you say spore prints really will help.

flaxton's picture

And you often cannot be sure

And you often cannot be sure that the id given on the web is correct.

jhn7's picture

Very true!

Of the few fungi I can identify with certainty I've come across some wrong identifications on google images, however you can find some interesting and reliable sites to bookmark for future reference.
It worries me that some identifications of fungi on iSpot I've seen are incorrect but they remain unchallenged or corrected (I don't know what they should be but know they are not what had been suggested). They come up as the species on searches or under other observations.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

flaxton's picture

There is no mechanism on

There is no mechanism on iSpot (that I know about) to "bump" observations that we feel are incorrect. All you can do is build up your "mushroom rating" and put forward a second id.

Fenwickfield's picture

Noticed

I have seen this also but do not know what the answer is to this unless an expert went through them all which is unlikely to happen.I wonder if it is worth you flagging this up on the forum site.

Fenwickfield

Martincito's picture

The Help pages include this:

The Help pages include this: "There is no shame in getting an identification wrong or in changing your mind - we all do it! However, on iSpot we are interested in demonstrating the process of identification, so that once you have added an identification you can't delete it, only add a revision. This shows how an identification has been arrived at, and also prevents the problem of someone clicking on "I agree" for a particular identification, and the identification then being changed." Following the ebb and flow of the ID process is a great way for novices like myself to learn about the subjects covered by this wonderful site.

jhn7's picture

As long as the 'ebb and flow' happen!

My problem is with observations that do not get any agreements or revisions. They disappear off into a gallery of thumbnails only to reappear underneath if some else identifies a specimen or does a search.
It has happened to some of my tentative IDs that have passed unnoticed and left me wondering if I was correct or worse misleading someone else.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

Martincito's picture

I understand, agree and feel

I understand, agree and feel exactly the same. I am thinking of posting the occasional plea on the forum for expert opinion on my "overlooked" observations with links to them...
Martin

timmy tiptoes's picture

ID of Fungi

IDing fungi is really hard and I agree that it is interesting to see the 'trail' as to how one arrives at a particular ID, or not, but I also agree that some that are desparate for ID disappear into the ether, never to resurface. How that is overcome I don't know as being a relative newbie to this site not sure of all the protocols. Sue