Fenwickfield's picture

Lichen on stone wall

Observed: 5th October 2011 By: FenwickfieldFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and LichensFenwickfield’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
5th October 2011 005
5th October 2011 005 1
Description:

On north facing drystone wall sandstone very bright cinnabar red but sadly no idea what it is were three in total approx size of finger nail.

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

  •  
    Likely ID
    Paint splash
    Confidence: It's likely to be this, but I can't be certain.
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

AlanS's picture

???

Could this be paint?

I don't think there is any lichen this colour?

Fenwickfield's picture

not sure

I have never used this colour paint before and it is on my garden wall no other properties for miles,if the stone had been at the top of the wall I would have brought it in the house and used the microscope,if not raining tomorrow could get the extension lead out and see if I can get a microscopic shot,

Fenwickfield

AlanS's picture

How about

bird excreta after they have been eating berries?

Otherwise still baffled.

Refugee's picture

What i did

I was fully expecting to be able to home in with street-view to see a red post box that has been newly painted. The location looks far to remote for a paint splash from that unless the stone has been recycled from a town.

Refugee

Fenwickfield's picture

not sure

The wall has been here as long as the house early 16th Century,the only thing it would have been recycled from is Hadrian's wall as not far and I don't have the luxury of post box or postman,have to collect it.As you sad Alan maybe bird dropping as lots of hawthorn about but not convinced,if this rain stopped I will get a microscopic picture today and post it onto the original observation.

It's a mystery

Fenwickfield

Refugee's picture

Repairs

It would be good to see an image showing the full height of the wall so that we can see if it looks like any modern repairs have been done as the google satellite does not show any outcrop that could have been used for this. The repair stone would have been obtained from an un-known location.

Refugee

AlanS's picture

History known, I suspect

Refugee,

You might have missed that this is Fenwickfield's own wall. Consequently, I imagine she knows the history of the wall and would be aware of any recent repairs. [I assume that Northumberland doesn't have a phantom wall repairer who creeps up in the night and replaces rocks in drystone walls?]

I am also assuming, unless Sheila corrects me on this, that there hasn't been a recent tomato ketchup fight, and that nobody has been eating a chicken ticka masala takeaway very messily. (?)

Alan

Refugee's picture

Modern.

I was thinking along the lines of 70 years ago or something like that. Post box paint was always quite long lived even that long ago. The new stuff is solvent free and fades after about 5 years.

Refugee

Fenwickfield's picture

Unlikley

I think it will have to stay as a mystery but thank you for your comments,no ketchup fights.I think that by looking at the wall it has never been repaired it is my garden and you can tell it is all old by the type of mortar on the copping stones.I think I should photograph the ones that can be identified instead.

Thanks again

Sheila

Fenwickfield

Refugee's picture

Positive

The trellis poles are indeed a sign that modern tools have been in contact with the wall and they are fixed with mortar. We have not yet eliminated paint being applied to a child's toy or even a bit of farming equipment at some time in the past close to the wall that has then been moved away. The result is positive on the modern works now i have seen the poles with added mortar. We also have to work out what that modern wooden fence was painted with too and make sure it did not replace one that was indeed painted red. That type of fence has a life of about 30 years.

Refugee

Fenwickfield's picture

old

The old fence was white and was on an Arial photo in 1963 and I put the new one in a couple of years ago stained with wood stain,I put the trellis on and the metal spikes were already there fixed into the wall with molten lead I presume was to stop cattle leaning over.Could be farm machinery from the past as a lot of old stuff was red or grey.

Fenwickfield

Refugee's picture

Got it!

Farm machinery would have been re-painted often in the past and it would have been done close to where the paint was stored. Also it goes at 3 fences every 100 years for the wood. The metal parts would last about 50 years before they rust off and would have also to be replaced.
My component life is based on metal armor plates that were by a river that were used for troops to shelter behind while defending against enemy troops in the west midlands (no sea salt). They would have been about 40-50 years old when i looked at them in the 1970's.

Refugee

miked's picture

Are the spots still there,

Are the spots still there, presumably if they were bird droppings they may have been washed off by the rain by now.

Fenwickfield's picture

Still

They are still on the wall,if They had been at the top I would have brought one in the house and used my microscope,maybe it will remain a mystery.

Fenwickfield

Refugee's picture

Thy this

Scrape a little bit off and take it indoors. This will give you an idea of the texture and a chance to get it under the microscope.

Refugee

Fenwickfield's picture

never thought

Better idea than mine and a lot easier too
Thanks

Fenwickfield