ChrisMcA's picture

Scrmbldegg_0713

Observed: 11th September 2011 By: ChrisMcAChrisMcA’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
scrmbldegg_0713
Description:

A large amount (good panful!) felt soft & wet like mousse

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

jhn7's picture

Put under 'Fungi and Lichens'

I have been advised in the past to enter slime moulds under 'Fungi and Lichens' even though they are not because more expert people who filter their observations will see them.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

ranon.2011's picture

It looks like the one that I

It looks like the one that I posted yesterday which somebody ID'd as 'Dog Vomit Slime Mould'. Are there varieties of this mould? I prefer Scrambled Egg to Dog Vomit.

jhn7's picture

Common names

I think the Dog vomit slime refers to the way it looks as it matures! Scrambled egg slime is another name for the same thing but when it looks slghtly nicer. Flowers of tan is another name.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

ChrisMcA's picture

Scrambledreply

I also undertood dogvomit slime as an alternative name; but keying in F.s. in Ispot noted the recommendeds included 5 vars (variants)(& 9 other Fuligo sp's!), & Googlg 'F.s. varieties' found geogragh.org.uk which said we have 2 vars, 'septica' found only as far N as Yorkshire, & 'flava' "in Scotland",named after it's yellow colour (& in the photo a very lurid yellow).The author, Lairich Rig, is against using 'Dog vomit' as it's far more dscriptive of the early stages of another slime mould.
+Waynesword shows a 'peanut butter' F.s.; & another said Plasmodial color can be affected by pH, temperature or ingested materials

ranon.2011's picture

When I first saw it, it

When I first saw it, it struck me a being a piece of lemon skin that somebody had thrown; hence, I titled my spot as that.