Fenwickfield's picture

Hedgehog

Observed: 9th September 2011 By: FenwickfieldFenwickfield’s reputation in MammalsFenwickfield’s reputation in MammalsFenwickfield’s reputation in Mammals
hedgehog
hedgehog 1
hedgehog 1 2
Description:

Very poorly and being attacked by Crows this late afternoon it was staggering about I fed it some meal worms which it scoffed,then contacted a hedgehog welfare office and He/She is now in the Vets under a heat lamp being cared for.If it survives I think I may have to have it overwinter as it is not big enough to hibernate,there was no visible damage just rather wrinkly reddish skin.Any ideas welcome

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Blewit Boy's picture

Red spots on skin.............

Red spots on skin could be flea bites. Hedgehogs are known to be prolific carriers.

chris

Hedgehog_Bottom's picture

Hedgehogs are not prolific

Hedgehogs are not prolific carriers. Less than 1% of our rescues have fleas.

Hedgehog fleas are much larger than cat and dog fleas, they are hog specific and cannot live on you, your dog, your cat or in your home.

Fenwickfield's picture

Thank's

Thanks Chris
I wonder if that is why it was so weak just hope it recovers as they have a hard enough time getting run over and this is the first year I have seen a number of them about my house.

Sheila

Fenwickfield

anonymous spotter's picture

They can also become ill -

through eating slugs that have succumbed to slug pellets. We use beer traps, but the squeamish probably don't like the job of emptying them.
I hope that this one survives!

Fenwickfield's picture

No pellets

Hi Roger
I don't use pellets or any chemicals only very cheap beer traps and a stone to squash them if there resilient.It is very rural and no neighbours for about 3 miles so not that.I am going to phone the vet's later and if it pulls through I will have to keep it over winter as it is too small to hibernate.I did find out something useful all vets have to take in wild animals free of charge.

Sheila

Fenwickfield

jhn7's picture

Progress report please

I was wondering how your hedgehog is, did he/she survive? It looks so fragile!

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

Fenwickfield's picture

Sad news

Hi Janet
I had a call from the vet this morning and it is not good,he say's it has either a brain injury or brain infection and will not survive he has suggested that it is put to sleep and I have reluctantly agreed as I cannot see it suffer.I know some people will disagree with what I have done but I cannot just stand back and do nothing,thanks for asking about it's welfare.

Sheila

Fenwickfield

jhn7's picture

I'm so sorry!

A hard decision but it is what I would have done. I know all the arguments about nature taking its course and not intervening but I'm the one urging the wildlife cameraperson to help individuals on Springwatch etc!! I have to catch the wasps / spiders who invade my home and release them outside even though I hate them (shouldn't admit that on iSpot).

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

anonymous spotter's picture

Sad!

But definitely the right decision, I think. At least you tried to help!

Fenwickfield's picture

Thank's

Thank's to you both for your reassuring kind words.

Fenwickfield

Hedgehog_Bottom's picture

Your sick hog

He may well have had a brain injury but looking at the state of him it's more likely he had a severe worm issue which had caused diahorrea and thus dehydration.

In common with all mammals 10% loss of body fluids causes the organs to start shutting down, if they are not caught in time they will die.

Hogs get worms from eating slugs and snails. Contrary to popular opinion, slugs and snails are less than 5% of their normal diet, they prefer worms, caterpillars and beetles. When the weather is bad or people spray to get rid of bugs, all that's left for them is slugs and slugs can kill them by passing on lungworm.

Please, if you have hedgehogs around leave out dishes of cat biscuits and shallow bowls of water to help them. You can easily make a feeding station from an upturned plastic crate with a 4x4 hole in the side, weight on top to stop cats turning it over.

If you get a clear crate you can watch them and if they know there is a food supply all year round they will come in regularly. Little ones that try to hibernate underweight need food available in the middle of winter so don't stop just because it gets cold.

Fenwickfield's picture

Thank's

Appreciate the information,I was aware of the slug and snail issue that they only ate them in desperation,I am fortunate to live were no chemicals are used as the surrounding farmland is organic,no roads and not cats either.I do see a lot of Hedgehogs were I live and will start a feeding station as you mentioned as they need all the help they can get.

Fenwickfield

the naturalist man's picture

Ill hedgehog

I've just discovered this one. I agree with hedgehog bottom this hedgehog is very severely dehydrated, poor thing. I suspect it was well past saving, you did the right thing both taking it to the vet, trying to save it; then making the hardest decision.

Graham Banwell

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