corylus's picture

Close up photos

Am I the only person to be puzzled by the odd closeup? Mine that come to mind are Parieteria at the Needles a while ago and an Umbilicus recently.I am a newcomer to macro photos & they are great but deceptive at times.The Ispot card is useful for scale yet I have not felt the need to use it yet as I think the scale on my shots is ok.Wish I could say the same about my shots which do vary!I think we all enjoy the Id challenges that Ispot gives( & in my case a brain workout.)In some cases a lot can be worked out by surrounding vegetation and I enjoyed zooming in on leaf litter on a fungi shot recently.Could we have some normal shots eg not just a birds'eye view of a flower and no foliage.This could give a wider range of folks more help which is what we are about.Thank you for bearing with me, in anticipation, Hazel :)

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anonymous spotter's picture

I'd second that

It is nice to have a close-up shot but also helpful sometimes to see the wider habitat in which the observation has been made.

Fenwickfield's picture

Third

The main shot should be normal so as you said you get the perspective and surrounding habitat.Then you can add some close ups which help with id but not just close ups unless it's invertebrates.The one thing I hate is the close up flower or leaf I must confess I do various shot's for fungi as they are so hard to identify just from one view.

Fenwickfield

ophrys's picture

Close ups

I can see what is being said, here, but does it really matter? I would happily put up a close-up of a flower alone, as long as the species is clear from that. I don't think that every species put up needs multiple angles and habitat attached, does it?! If someone adds just a good close up picture of a flower, that adds to the variety on the carousel for the species, and that is where it can be useful for anyone wishing to get to grips with its appearance.

Ian
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the naturalist man's picture

Close ups

I agree with this wholeheartedly, especially for trees.

I've recently been putting together iSPot keys to cover around 120 of Britain's commonest trees. For these keys we like to use pictures from iSpot (with full credits of course) to help promote the high quality and diversity of postings; however, I've found lots of fantastic pictures of leaves, flowers, fruit, even buds but very few pictures of the whole tree! Some observations even show collections of photographs showing the parts of a tree (leaves, buds, fruit etc.) but then don't show the whole tree. I hadn't realised this till I started searching iSpot. The shape of a tree can sometimes help in its identification as well as putting the observation in context.

Hence, please consider that close-ups are extremely useful but don't forget the wider shot.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411

Refugee's picture

Trees

If i do put a tree on it is usually for something that is on it.
http://www.ispot.org.uk/node/246206
In this case i was not quite sure what Willow tree it was. The Gall is what i was looking and they were all over it. The experts may ask for it but in this case i can put it in plants as well.

Refugee

the naturalist man's picture

Trees

Refugee, that is a different situation to the one I was referring to, you are right there is little need to post pictures of whole trees when the post is about an invertebrate or whatever living in, or on, the tree (I'm sure some gall specialist will shoot me down for saying that as I'll bet the species can be important for some!).

My post was about people posting tree species and only showing leaves etc. showing the whole tree not only makes the post more complete but can help with identification in the case of some sub-species or varieties.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411

Refugee's picture

Species

Whenever i discover an interesting looking species i will put it on if i can get a good enough picture. In the case of the Gall some of them are very species specific and the ID of the tree may be important as it is with Fungi. I only put the link in to show the general way you would like to see large trees to be shown. I did not bother with the Ash Key Gall as that was clear from the black buds alone and anyway the tree was growing in scrubby way and was more of a large sapling and not that representative.

Refugee

Fenwickfield's picture

tree type

I agree that you do need a full view of a tree as the shape is so important for identification.I have a very good book on tree's and there is always a full photo of the tree,then smaller close up's of the leaf,flower,bark,fruit,cone.I don't think this is an unreasonable request as it's in a person's best interest to put good shot's on if they want a correct id.

Fenwickfield

Wildlife Ranger's picture

Macros

Its chalk and Cheese . Photographing planst is usually systematic . I personally would post x6 images in theory but not all planst need them . They would be 1) BasAl 2)mid /upper leaves 3) Flowers stamens and symetry , 4) sepals or 5) stems which is most of the descriptive botany.

These obs can be supported by a Physical mesasurement , relativity is not necessary a good thing The Plants is as tall as a Shovel - how big is the shovel and will you have the same shovel as me :-)

There are examples where macro is very useful take the difference between Agrimony and fragrant agrimony which involve noting / keying whether hairs on the stem are adpressed or vice versa. The Umbelfers also sometimes require diferentiating via Fruits and Seeds you would be bang on with a good quality macro shot in this area

The most important thing is that we all have fun and enjoy the Botanising Happy Hunting in 2012 its all about to spring into action

WLR

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the naturalist man's picture

Enjoy!

I agree with Wildlife Ranger, consider the points made above but most of all enjoy getting out, investigating and taking photos!

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411