Russell Miller's picture

Pediacus depressus?

Observed: 3rd August 2011 By: Russell MillerRussell Miller’s reputation in InvertebratesRussell Miller’s reputation in Invertebrates
Pediacus depressus0001.jpg
Pediacus depressus0001.jpg 1
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

markgtelfer's picture

Pediacus

I'm not sure I could tell the two Pediacus species apart on that photo. P. dermestoides is much more frequent than P. depressus.

Russell Miller's picture

Pediacus

Yes it is not the best photo (the beetle arrived at a moth trapping so my attention was elsewhere). I could send you a higher resolution copy (not sure how to upload a 2nd image here without creating a new observation).
My id was based on comparing these photos:
P. dermestoides
http://www.thewcg.org.uk/pages/cucujidae.htm
P. depressus
http://www.kerbtier.de/cgi-bin/enFSearch.cgi?Fam=Cucujidae
and also the WCG description, esp of pronotum shape. On my photo (perhaps not this version) the pronotum looks square and not transverse.

Roger Gilbert's picture

Click on the edit tab ...

at the top of the observation and you can add a photo.

Howardian Local Nature Reserve
http://www.howardianlnr.org.uk

Russell Miller's picture

higher resolution image

OK I've uploaded the original photo without reduction. Does this help getting to species level? It would be really good to confirm if possible.
Colour, though maybe not definitive, suggests P. depressus.

markgtelfer's picture

Pediacus depressus

I've compared my specimens side by side and your photo does show the more quadrate pronotum of depressus. I'm pretty confident that's what it is though I'd be happier if I could see the distinctive pronotal hind-angles. I know a couple of lifelong coleopterists who've never seen this species.

Russell Miller's picture

Pediacus depressus

Thank you for taking the time to examine this so carefully. According to the NBN site this is the first sighting since 1913 in London and only the 2nd ever inside the M25 area. It should help raise awareness of the importance of Abney Park Cemetery Nature Reserve as a precious London site for woodland invertebrates.