Sarah West's picture

A Russula

Observed: 14th August 2011 By: Sarah West
OPAL Community ScientistYorkshire Naturalists' Union
Sarah West’s reputation in Fungi and LichensSarah West’s reputation in Fungi and LichensSarah West’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
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Description:
Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

miked's picture

Possibly Russula

Possibly Russula brunneoviolacea, another possibility might be R. cyanoxantha which can also look similar to this and there might be other Russulas similar too.

flaxton's picture

Or R parazurea.

Or R parazurea.

Sarah West's picture

Thanks, we really weren't

Thanks, we really weren't sure about this one. How can you tell the difference between the three you mentioned?

Sarah West
www.OPALexplorenature.org
OPAL Community Scientist
Yorkshire and Humber

flaxton's picture

Sarah (and anyone else

Sarah (and anyone else interested)
With a little experience it is easy to identify to the Genus Russula. When you get that far you need to look for the identifying features for this family.
The colour of the spore print
size if the cap
the amount that the cap peels back
whether the gills are fragile or "rubbery"
whether it has a mild or hot taste.
Then it gets more serious with the reaction of the stem to FeSO4 and guiac gum.

With the suggestion for this find cyanozantha has the rubbery gills and a white spore print.
brunneoviolacea grows under oak parazurea under conifer.

miked's picture

By the way where can you get

By the way where can you get hold of FeSO4 crystal, have tried a variety of sources (at the uni here) but without success. have I asked you this before, have had suggestions about making your own I think.

flaxton's picture

Although I have the remnants

Although I have the remnants of a small crystal I now tend to use a 10% acidic Ferrous Sulphate solution purchased through The Association of British Fungus Groups. It supplies most of the chemicals that are needed.

miked's picture

Thanks, will try them.

Thanks, will try them. Actually just remembered I did try them last year and you need to be a member before you can buy the reagents. Might be interesting to be a member of them and BMS at same time or if they are exclusive.

flaxton's picture

Not exclusive. I am a member

Not exclusive. I am a member of both. Unfortunately although members of each group get on well there is animosity between the upper echelons.

Sarah West's picture

Thanks that is really helpful

Thanks that is really helpful :o)

Sarah West
www.OPALexplorenature.org
OPAL Community Scientist
Yorkshire and Humber