Peter Pearson's picture

Unknown fungus

Observed: 9th August 2011 By: Peter PearsonPeter Pearson’s reputation in Fungi and LichensPeter Pearson’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
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Description:

Found on a roadside mown grass verge under oak and birch. Unfortunately someone had disturbed them. The group consisted of about 6 specimens. One had been split so that I was able to photograph a section through the cap

Identifications

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Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

  •  
    Likely ID
    Boletus (sp)
    Confidence: It might be this.
    ID agreements (): 2 People
    • flaxtonflaxton’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensflaxton’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensflaxton’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensflaxton’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensflaxton’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
    • Mushroom LadyMushroom Lady’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMushroom Lady’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMushroom Lady’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMushroom Lady’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

flaxton's picture

The weather conditions have

The weather conditions have caused the very severe cracking and this is making identification almost impossible but if I had to put a name to it I would suggest B radicans.

Peter Pearson's picture

My unidentified Bolteus

Thanks for your observations
I am a complete novice with fungi and use Michael Jordans 'Encyclopedia of Fungi of Britain and Europe' as my guide. However identification is confused by the many similar looking species and the fact that many have two or more scientific names.

I looked at two posibilities 1.Xerocomus armeniacus 2.Xerocomus chrysenteron (Red-cracking Bolete) the later species location fitting exactly the description in Jordan. I had no idea weather extremes could cause the cap to crack and distort,we have plenty of those this year.

flaxton's picture

Hi You are right in that your

Hi
You are right in that your two suggestions both show signs of cracking in the cap when they mature but armeniacus has a cherry red to pinkish orange cap and chrysenteron usually shows red between the cracks. Both of these species also have some degree of colour change to blue in the flesh when it is exposed to the air. I still think B radicans or possibly B impolitus are the most likely. Was there any noticable smell?

Peter Pearson's picture

Fungus smell

I did take a sniff at the broken example in the photo, but there was no noticable odour.

flaxton's picture

B impolitus is quite strong

B impolitus is quite strong so not that then.

flaxton's picture

See my recent find of B

See my recent find of B radicans and you will see the similarity in the cap structure.