Mushroom Lady's picture

Deceiver, Laccaria laccata

Observed: 8th August 2011 By: Mushroom LadyMushroom Lady’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMushroom Lady’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMushroom Lady’s reputation in Fungi and LichensMushroom Lady’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
Deceiver, Laccaria laccata prob (2)
Deceiver, Laccaria laccata prob (2) 1
Description:

Found in deciduous woods in an area of peat bog.

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

miked's picture

It does have the general look

It does have the general look of laccaria, presumably it was not Gymnopilus penetrans stem does not look right for that and what about spore colour?

Mushroom Lady's picture

I don't think it was G.

I don't think it was G. penetrans - the cap was too hygrophanous for that, and I think the habitat would suggest L. laccata rather than G.penetrans.

I didn't pick it because it was found on a nature reserve. Is there a way of determining spore colour without doing a spore print?

Mushroom Lady

flaxton's picture

The colour of the gills is

The colour of the gills is often a good indication but not always. Then as Mike suggested if you can see spores on the stem, ring or cap of a close neighbour. If you need an id this unfortunately often does involve picking the fruit-body. With a lot of fungi especially the more unusual ones needs a lot more than the spore colour but to find out if a rare fungus is growing in the reserve is worth loosing one or two "apples" from the tree.

miked's picture

Interesting one, you can

Interesting one, you can often get an idea by looking carefully at the ground or bits of vegetation or cobwebs under or near the cap. in a few of the recent observations it has been possible to rule in or out a genus by looking carefully at these things. for example i think someone suggested a russula but if you zoomed right in you could see brown spores on cobwebs below the cap and of course russulas don't have brown spores.

Mushroom Lady's picture

Thanks to you both. That's

Thanks to you both. That's very helpful.

Mushroom Lady