oceanlis2000's picture

Unknown fungi-waxcap

Observed: 1st November 2007 By: oceanlis2000oceanlis2000’s reputation in Fungi and Lichensoceanlis2000’s reputation in Fungi and Lichens
Waxcap stalk
Unknown waxcap
Waxcap habitat
Description:
Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Blewit Boy's picture

Definitely a waxcap................

Definitely a waxcap. But as for species, I couldn't say. Might be Golden Waxcap (Hygrocybe chlorophana).

chris

Rob Coleman's picture

Sorry - just noticed Blewit

Sorry - just noticed Blewit Boy's comment after posting my guess. I went for H. chlorophana too but it would be difficult to be more certain without further detail. This waxcap has a slimy cap when wet.

Rob Coleman

Blewit Boy's picture

Don't worry....................

Don't worry I forgive you Rob. It's comforting to know we came up with the same conclusion, although of course we could both be wrong! hee hee.

chris

oceanlis2000's picture

Unknown fungi-waxcap

What kind of further details are necessary for an ID, I can have a look this year and see if they appear again
Thanks

Elis

Blewit Boy's picture

Next time...............

Next time try to get a shot of the underside of the cap, i.e. the gills. They are particularly useful in trying to identify fungi to a species level. Also note the dimensions, or put something beside the fungi to indicate scale. I often use a 1p coin. Also make a note of any distinctive characteristics, such as smell, habitat, colour (sometimes colours in photos do not reflect the actual colour seen with the naked eye). Hope this helps for next time.

chris

Rob Coleman's picture

I agree with the Chris's

I agree with the Chris's comments above. I think fungi are particularly difficult to identify from pictures alone as a lot of key identification features rely on our other senses - textures, smells, (tastes!) etc. Sometimes you need the coax the mushroom to perform its 'trick' e.g. cut the stipe to see if you get a colour change, wet the cap to see if it becomes slimy...I'd always recommend taking a specimen so you can try these things out later.

Rob Coleman

Blewit Boy's picture

Photos are...........

Photos are still of course very useful. As Mike Dodd (our resident expert) pointed out recently, sometimes you miss something in the field which you may later pick up on in a photograph. But also I agree with Rob about it being useful to take a sample. As he says taste is also important, particulary in Lactarius spp.(Milkcaps). Never be afraid to have a nibble, so long as you spit afterwards, you'll be fine. Although I bet I'm going to get a torrent of comments now saying that this is ill advised!

chris