Jonathan's picture

Solomon's seal sawfly larvae

Observed: 21st June 2009 By: Jonathan
iSpot team
Jonathan’s reputation in InvertebratesJonathan’s reputation in InvertebratesJonathan’s reputation in InvertebratesJonathan’s reputation in Invertebrates
Solomns seal sawfly2
Solomons seals sawfly1
Description:

These appear in my garden each year. Interesting how aggregated they are. Some leaflets have none, others are like the picture

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Solomon's seal sawfly (Phymatocera aterrima) interacts

Comments

miked's picture

wonder if they affect the

wonder if they affect the wild plants so much, don't remember them being eaten but its a long time since i've seen the plants in the wild.

the naturalist man's picture

Solomon's seal sawfly

I was in Millington Wood, an ancient ash woodland in the Yorkshire Wolds, last week where there are carpets of Solomon's seal. I saw no evidence of the sawfly larvae; is it a southern species?

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411

jeannette's picture

sawfly

I have this pest in my garden . Renfrewshire. Just found it this year.

Syrphus's picture

I don't know how far north it

I don't know how far north it gets or how common it is in Scotland, but I have just found some in my garden in NH45, N of Inverness.

Murdo

TRY

recording wildlife with The Recorder's Year on www.hbrg.org.uk/TRY.html.

Martin Harvey's picture

distribution and foodplants

Benson's Royal Ent. Soc. key to sawflies was published in 1952, and he describes how P. aterrima had been first found in Britain in Putney (London) in 1846, but didn't start spreading much more widely until the 20th century, when it quickly spread through southern England and Wales. He says that by 1931 it had reached Notts, by 1938 Staffs, and by 1949 Cheshire.

Benson describes Solomon's-seal as its main foodplant, both wild and in gardens, but it can also feed on related species, and on the continent has been recorded from Lily-of-the-Valley; see the BRC foodplant database:
http://www.brc.ac.uk/dbif/invertebratesresults.aspx?insectid=6660

The sawfly recording scheme doesn't yet provide records to the NBN gateway, so the NBN map is misleadingly sparese at the moment:
http://data.nbn.org.uk/gridMap/gridMap.jsp?allDs=1&srchSpKey=NBNSYS00000...

----
Entomologist and biological recorder