pb5462's picture

Unknown one (2)

Observed: 12th May 2011 By: pb5462
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - course complete
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Unknown one (2)
Unknown one (2) 1
Unknown one (2) 1 2
Description:

Growing amongst Spanish Bluebells in fairly heavy shade under trees. Area was formerly a planned garden.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Wood Dock (Rumex sanguineus) interacts

Comments

Chalkie's picture

Interesting

I saw some dock earlier today in a wood, and had just thought it was 'ordinary' dock and didn't look it up. Lazy. I think I need to be a bit more careful - it looked much more like this! I'll have to go back and look more carefully.

AlanS's picture

Look for red veins

To pb5462

What you have here is Rumex sanguineus var. viridis, with green veins in the leaf, but a number of years ago, mooching around South Queensferry, I found populations of the true Red-veined Dock, Rumex sanguineus var. sanguineus, with very prominent red-purple veining. Would be nice to know if it still persists.

By the way, those are Hybrid Bluebells (Hyacinthoides x massartiana), not Spanish Bluebells.

Alan

pb5462's picture

bluebells

Thanks for the info, I should be back in the area shortly I'll have a look for the veining.
That's interesting about the bluebells as I had been told they were Spanish, can I ask how you were able to identify them as hybrid?

Thanks

AlanS's picture

Spanish Bluebells

True Hyacinthoides hispanica has erect inflorescences which are not at all one-sided and with the flowers not hanging down; the flowers are much more broadly bell-shaped, and have blue anthers. It is a much rarer escape than the hybrid, and the great majority of records of Spanish Bluebell are known to refer to the hybrid (which is fully fertile). There have been a number of 'observations' of the hybrid posted to iSpot in the past month, in several cases as H. hispanica, which was then corrected.

True H. hispanica is known along the coast a bit, a few plants at Longniddry Bents in East Lothian.

As for Red-veined Dock, I clicked on the above link to Google Maps and I think you must have been very close to where I saw it. I recall it being west of the bridge, in marginal woodland.

Alan