Anna's picture

Badger sett

Observed: 13th December 2009 By: Anna
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - current student
Anna’s reputation in MammalsAnna’s reputation in Mammals
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Comments

the naturalist man's picture

Badger Sett

This has the characteristic shape of a sett hole, wider at the bottom than the top.

However, the amount of leaves and sticks across the entrance show it is not used at present. Each territory will have two, three or even four setts, only one will usually be used. When young first leave the family group they sometimes move into satellite, unused setts for a short time before moving out of the territory.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411

Anna's picture

Ah, that will explain why

Ah, that will explain why there are so many unused entrances. The territory covers quite a large area. How far will one family of badgers go? I would like to find out which setts are likely to belong to the same family, to see how many groups we have around us.

the naturalist man's picture

Badger territory size

A very hard question to answer. It all depends upon the density of badger setts. Territories can range from a handful of entrances in good food areas to over a hundred entrances and a half mile square in size in poor food areas. Hoever, it is not just food which limits the size of a territory.

The only sure way of assessing the size of a territory is to plot the latrines, shallow pits with badger droppings in the bottom. These are used as boundary markers. Beware though, there will also be a series of latrines close to the sett entrance.

For more information visit www.Badgerland.

http://www.badgerland.co.uk/animals/sett.html

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411

foxy's picture

Territory size.

Here on my farm I have a sett of at least 12 entrances over a square about 20 meters by 25 meters, in a small wood of 1 hectare in size.Following a bovine T.B outbreak 2 years ago alot of survey work was done to see what if any role they played in its spread to other herds not adjoining the infected ones.It determined that they travelled up to 1-1.5km from this sett to other satellite setts as Graham says,in a disused gravelpit,another wood ,a bog and that they "lay out"in secluded areas with no setts in good weather.
At the moment the only track leading into the sett is that of a fox so I guess their not home,or as some older people around here say they may have gone into a short period of hibernation,I havent seen any badger tracks in weeks locally.

regards foxy

Foxy

the naturalist man's picture

Hibernation

Badgers do kind of semi-hibernate in that they will stay in their setts for a few days in bad weather but then hunger forces them out. It is not true hiberation as they do not go into a torpor, only dormice in this country truely hibernate.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411