Vinny's picture

Four-spotted Chasers

Observed: 25th April 2011 By: VinnyVinny’s reputation in InvertebratesVinny’s reputation in InvertebratesVinny’s reputation in InvertebratesVinny’s reputation in Invertebrates
LibQua_IMG_3964
LibQua_IMG_3964 1
Description:

Several of these Chasers on the heath today. Able to approach good and close with a macro lens before they were fully warmed up.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Vinny's picture

If you look...

...at the full-size image of the first one in particular, you'll see some fine detail. I'm always amazed at how their bodies look like they are made up of blobs of amber. Stunning insects!
Vinny

Nature girl's picture

Great detail!

I'd be interested to know which lens you were using as I'm thinking of getting a macro lens for my slr, but not really sure what would be best.

Vinny's picture

Macro lens

I'm a Canon user, and currently have a 100 mm macro which I've had tremendous fun with over the 5 years I've had it. Pinpoint sharp, but you need to understand your aperture settings with it. Very easy to take things too shallow. Slight disadvantage is you need to get close to smaller subjects to fill the frame - which makes skittish things like butterflies, dragonflies and lizards tricky. I'm getting a Canon compatible Sigma 180 mm macro soon, which has more 'reach' for this kind of subject. It's highly rated and at about half the price of the Canon equivalent is good value (£530 for a new one is about the cheapest I've seen so far).
Vinny

Nature girl's picture

Thanks Vinny. I have a Canon

Thanks Vinny. I have a Canon too so that's interesting to know. It's difficult to know the best focal length, but I'll look into it.

RoyW's picture

It's often about finding the best middle ground!

"but you need to understand your aperture settings with it. Very easy to take things too shallow"
It's just as easy to ruin a macro shot by opening up the aperture too much and bringing a messy, distracting background into focus!

Unless the background to your subject is completely clear you sometimes need to sacrifice some depth of field to avoid 'losing' the subject against the background. (I know that you understand this Vinny - it's clear from your excellent shots!).