monty's picture

What is it? Fruiting body/chrysalis/poo?

Observed: 12th April 2011 By: monty
guy's puzzle_1
guy's puzzle_1 1
Description:

Spotted by my son on S-facing side of fencepost. On first inspection 10am-ish, texture was firm and soil like. In pm, having had sun on it, had dried and fine dust (spore-like) emerged when touched. We don't know what it is.

Identifications

Caution: Do NOT use iSpot to identify fungi to eat!

Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Reticularia lycoperdon interacts

Comments

Fenwickfield's picture

Need to

I would change it to the fungi section all you do is click the edit

Fenwickfield

monty's picture

thanks to you, and to RogerR,

thanks to you, and to RogerR, for the speedy id and extra info. It's all fascinating!

monty

anonymous spotter's picture

Reticularia lycoperdon

Despite the name of "false puffball" found in some references, this is a slime mould not a true fungus. As suggested above, though, that is the best category to put it in.
Imagine how many of the microscopic single-celled individuals there must be in an aggregate of this size!

Mushroom Lady's picture

I have also come across the

I have also come across the name Enteridium Lycoperdon. Does anyone know which is the more usual/most up-to-date version. Is there a definitive list anywhere of current names of fungi and previous names? Thanks for your help.

Mushroom Lady

Fenwickfield's picture

Your right

Enteridiun lycoperdon is the old name in Jordens book so when you put it in Ispot it changes it to the new one.I did an id on this last week and flaxton put the new name in I put the old I have now crossed it out my book and put the new one in,and as if Fungi were not difficult enough,as for a list I don't know but Ispot does seem to correct them.

Fenwickfield

Mushroom Lady's picture

Thanks for your help, but I

Thanks for your help, but I do recall an occasion when I used the ISpot ID and one of the experts corrected that one, so I'm a bit confused about where to get the definitive answer on the current name.

Mushroom Lady

flaxton's picture

Try using this

Try using this link
http://www.fieldmycology.net/GBCHKLST/gbchklst.asp

If you type the name you know in the box "Enteridium" and click "search for genus" it should give you the details of the appropriate Genus, Family, Order, Subclass, Class, Phylum.
Click on the genus name it gives you and up will come a list of all the known Enteridium species. One of those is E. lycoperdon and the new name Reticularia lycoperdon. Click on that and it gives the details of all finds that have been recorded on the BMS database.

Mal

Mushroom Lady's picture

Thanks, Mal That's very

Thanks, Mal

That's very useful. I'm still a little confused about how I would know which name is in current usage.

Mushroom Lady

flaxton's picture

If Enteridium is the name you

If Enteridium is the name you currently use by going through the steps outlined you will be shown that what used to be Enteridium is now Reticularia.
As an example I have found a few fruitbodies of Inonotus radiatus (the Alder Bracket in most books) recently but when I came to look at the database there were no records showing for the species. By looking up the genus Inonotus it tells me that although most species have not changed Inonotus radiatus has now been reclassified and is now called Mensularia radiata. A quick look at the database now shows the "missing" records under its new name.
I hope that makes sense.
Mal

Mushroom Lady's picture

Thanks for your help. I'm

Thanks for your help. I'm sure after a bit of practice I'll get the hang of it. In the meantime, it's good to have the support of other more experienced mycophiles on iSpot to explain things :-)

Mushroom Lady

anonymous spotter's picture

Basically -

"On Tuesday, when it hails and snows,
The feeling on me grows and grows
That hardly anybody knows
If those are these or these are those."
— A.A. Milne

As we learn more about the genetic make-up of various species, we find relationships we didn't know about, and other apparent ones turn out to be false. Hence the confusion - or at least part of it.
Have a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Commission_on_Zoological_Nome... - there is a similar botanical commission I think.

Mushroom Lady's picture

Yes, thank you, Roger There's

Yes, thank you, Roger

There's a link to the botanical commission on the website you've referred to. I'll have to try to digest some of this information.

Mushroom Lady