WTSWW's picture

Ruby Tiger (Phragmatobia fuliginosa)

Observed: 21st April 2010 By: WTSWW
The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales
WTSWW’s reputation in InvertebratesWTSWW’s reputation in Invertebrates
Ruby Tiger (Phragmatobia fuliginosa)
Description:

Saw this moth in a polytunnel.. not it's usual habitat i suspect, though the polytunnel is open at both ends so it had the choice to leave

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Ruby Tiger (Phragmatobia fuliginosa) interacts

Comments

Martin Harvey's picture

first brood

Ruby Tiger has two broods (at least in Berkshire it does), one in April/May and another in July-September. In my experience the second brood is observed far, far more frequently than the first brood: the Berkshire database has 31 first-brood records and 1,068 second brood records.

In the Waring/Townsend field guide it is suggested that the first brood has a greater tendency to be day-flying, while the second brood is more nocturnal, so part of the difference in recording may be that the second brood is more readily found in moth traps, but perhaps the difference between broods may reflect a genuine difference in numbers, with high mortality over winter and then a successful summer generation producing a large second brood each year.

Random fact for the day: the Ruby Tiger is the only British species that has the word "ruby" as part of its English name (unless anyone knows better!).

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Entomologist and biological recorder

DavidHowdon's picture

Ruby

What about Ruby-tailed Wasp (a wasp) or Siberian Rubythroat (a bird).

Martin Harvey's picture

rubies

I'd argue that the wasp name refers to a group not a species so doesn't count! And I could argue that "rubythroat" is one word, so not the same as the word "ruby", but I won't!

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Entomologist and biological recorder

WTSWW's picture

Ruby

You made me chuckle this morning - so thank you!

The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales is a local membership charity working to protect biodiversity and promote living landscapes and living seas.