grant burleigh's picture

Solitary Bee

Observed: 17th March 2011 By: grant burleighgrant burleigh’s reputation in Invertebratesgrant burleigh’s reputation in Invertebratesgrant burleigh’s reputation in Invertebratesgrant burleigh’s reputation in Invertebratesgrant burleigh’s reputation in Invertebrates
P030
Description:
Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

eucera's picture

clarkella

Matt is spot on. This is most likely to be A. clarkella.

What this all highlights is how utterly unhelpful some of the manufactured "English Names" of species are. A. haemorrhoa is one of the later spring species of Andrena to emerge. If the manufacturers of vernacular names were doing their bit by translating latin epithets into English then the "Early Mining-bee" should be Andrena praecox. I'll leave others to work out a good translation of "haemorrhoa"

Stuart
Chairman BWARS
www.bwars.com

grant burleigh's picture

Solitary bee

Thank you for these comments. I still have a number of solitary bee images, not posted, from last year. I may put some more up but am inclined to wait and see what transpires this year and if I can get images from more angles.

grant burleigh's picture

clarkella

Is there any known nuance of habitat that would explain why A. clarkella appears early?

Matt Smith's picture

A.clarkella

A.clarkella, along with a few other Andrena species, specialise in collecting pollen only from sallow and willow catkins. These flower early, so the bees have to be out early to match the flowering.

Tachinid Recording Scheme

www.tachinidae.org.uk

TRS Facebook Page
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Tachinid-Recording-Scheme/376652392364707

jonmortin's picture

Andrena

Why could this not be Andrena nitida? The abdomen of A.nitida appears black (almost hairless) and shiny. The abdomen of clarkella is very hairy so doesn't appear shiny. Also in the BRERC (former Avon) area A.clarkella has yet to be recorded whereas nitida is very common from late March onwards.

Matt Smith's picture

A.nitida

NBN shows a few records for A.clarkella for the Somerset/Avon region.

As you say, A.nitida has a shiny, almost hairless abdomen. It also has a couple of patches of white hairs on the upper part of the abdomen and I can't see those in the picture, this bee has an all black abdomen that is hairy. Also, the overall "jiz" for this bee is just not right for A.nitida.

Tachinid Recording Scheme

www.tachinidae.org.uk

TRS Facebook Page
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Tachinid-Recording-Scheme/376652392364707

eucera's picture

Nitida v. clarkella

A. nitida has very pale hairs on the sides of the thorax and obvious pale patches on the lateral margins of the first tergite (these are distinct even in worn & faded specimens).

I would also caution against using known distribution as a key character. With many of the commoner species, the finer details of distribution are rather imperfectly known

Stuart
Chairman BWARS
www.bwars.com