jhn7's picture

Pink Primrose - Polyanthus?

Observed: 16th March 2011 By: jhn7
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - course complete
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P1110119-1
P1050787-1
Description:

1st photo taken today, 2nd photo taken March last year. I suppose it is a garden escapee but it does look pretty in the wood.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Fenwickfield's picture

change

I would put is as polyanthus which is the name for the hybridised one's.I do think it is still just as lovely and will stand out even more among the yellow's of the primrose.

Sheila

Fenwickfield

jhn7's picture

Thanks!

I thought Polyanthus were multi headed and stronger stemmed but I'm sure you are right.
I just love all woodland primroses / polyanthus - they look so gentle.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

corylus's picture

Pink Primrose

Not uncommon to see pink tinges.The flower looks large compared to the leaf like Polyanthus(also Primula).Primulas hybridize naturally a lot.Have seen a lot of crosses between Primroses and Cowslips today.

Hazel Trevan

jhn7's picture

No cowslips here yet.

I remember carpets of cowslips as a child.

Janet
Certificate in Contemporary Science (Open)

Fenwickfield's picture

right

In the books I have looked at they seem to group primula,Auricula and polyanthus together,so to be honest I am not quite sure,but your right we always think of polyanthus as multi headed and probably not as danty as yours.I hope we get an answer from one of the expert's as I am intregued now.

Sheila

Fenwickfield

Chris Metherell's picture

Primula x polyantha Mill.

I'm no expert on Primula so I'll probably just add to the confusion. This is the name applied to crosses of primrose (P. vulgaris) and cowslip (P. veris). It occurs spontaneoulsy in the wild and is generally intermediate between the two species as regards most characters, the yellow flowers normally being borne in an umbel. It's fertile too. As far as I know, the garden plants known as polyanthus were developed from this cross, and exhibit a wide variety of colours - white, purple, mauve and so on. Of course they escape all over the place, and persist for long periods of time. So generally plants of the type shown in the photograph are recorded as P x polyantha. Auricula is the common name for P. auricula. Not native here but found in one or two places (native in Central Southern Europe). This is, perhaps with all sorts of selection activity, the origin of the wide variety of cultivated auriculas. I find them one of the most beautiful cultivated plants. Wish I had the time to grow them! But as far as I know they do not escape over the fence. perhaps that helps.

Chris Metherell
BSBI VC Recorder
North Northumberland

corylus's picture

Primula etc.

Expect we will have lots more photos to come.I love colour but there is something special about Primroses &Cowslips.Nearly took a photo of our local hybrids & will do so some time.

Hazel Trevan