RHoman's picture

Cameraria gaultheriella

Observed: 20th November 2009 By: RHomanRHoman’s reputation in InvertebratesRHoman’s reputation in InvertebratesRHoman’s reputation in InvertebratesRHoman’s reputation in InvertebratesRHoman’s reputation in Invertebrates
Cameraria gaultheriella leaf mine in Gaultheria shallon
Description:

Leaf mine of Cameraria gaultheria in Gaultheria shallon. The leaf was part of a bunch of flowers bought in Cheltenham, Glos., and came via a Dutch wholesaler, probably originally from the NW Pacific region of N America. Florists know the plant as salal or shallon and it is widely used for winter "greenery".

Identifications
  •  
    Likely ID
    Cameraria gaultheriella
    Confidence: I'm as sure as I can be.
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Martin Harvey's picture

interesting

Interesting to see this. Has anyone managed to hatch out an adult moth in this country yet?

----
Entomologist and biological recorder

RHoman's picture

Adult moths

To the best of my knowledge the answer is "no" - there are currently only 3 records (including the one under discussion); 2 involved dead larvae (the present one and another I found in March 2007) + another with a live larva that didn't make it in 2008.

There almost certainly isn't anything special about the flowers available in Cheltenham, so there must be other leaves out there somewhere!

Robert Homan

Jonathan's picture

I see that this moth is in

I see that this moth is in the same genus as the one that is currently devastating horse chestnut. Is C.gaultheriella a similar threat to any British plants?

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

RHoman's picture

Never say never, but...

The conditions which the plant and the larvae undergo in the commercial processes of harvesting and transporting (refridgeration, potential desiccation of the leaves, potential over-wetting of the leaves to keep them fresh, plant import checks) perhaps conspire against the moth gaining a foothold. The plant most at risk is Gaultheria shallon which is regarded as a pest species where it is most widespread, e.g. in Scotland, so in the unlikley event that the moth got here, it could be seen as a potential biological control. I think with Cameraria ohridella it is adult insects that arrived in the UK thus giving the species a much more secure start in the invasion process.

Robert Homan

Jonathan's picture

Interesting that Gaultheria

Interesting that Gaultheria shallon should be imported by florists when it could be harvested in Scotland, from what you say.

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)