lst55's picture

Plant in a tree

Observed: 16th November 2009 By: lst55
S159 Neighbourhood Nature - course complete
lst55’s reputation in Plants
tree plant
Tree plant 2
Description:

This plant was growing on lots of the lime trees along this driveway, usually in the damp crevices- from a distance I thought it was a green fungus.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Navelwort (Umbilicus rupestris) interacts

Comments

the naturalist man's picture

Navelwort

This plant always reminds me of the West coast of Britain, we don't get it on this side of the Pennines.

Graham Banwell

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Bumblebee's picture

I would agree with this being

I would agree with this being Navelwort, we have quite a lot of this down in Cornwall..

This is an edible flower and is from the family Crassulaceae and is from the Genus Umbilicus.

Jo

Jo :)
Conservation Student Cornwall

lst55's picture

Thanks

Thank you for the ID and comments, good to know what it is for next time :-D

Lucy

OU Student

cp345's picture

also called pennywort

I love the photo of it in the crevice - very common down here in Cornwall but usually seen on walls - it has a long infloresence of greenish-white flowers in summer - I know it as pennywort (probably other local names?)and Rose gives the common name as 'Navelwort or Wall Pennywort'.

the naturalist man's picture

I also used to know this as

I also used to know this as penywort. Some other names it has are Lady's navel, associated with Mary in Christian mythology; Jack-in-the-hedge, kidneywort, as it was thought to help pass kidney stones; Venus's navel by the Romans; and coolers as it was thought to take the heat out of burns.

Graham Banwell

Visit the iSpot Yorkshire forum for information on events, issues and news relating to 'God's own country'
http://www.ispot.org.uk/forum/8411