andyk's picture

Oedemerid beetle?

Observed: 11th February 2011 By: andyk
London Natural History Society
andyk is knowledgeable about Invertebratesandyk’s earned reputation in Invertebratesandyk’s earned reputation in Invertebratesandyk’s earned reputation in Invertebratesandyk’s earned reputation in Invertebratesandyk’s earned reputation in Invertebrates
Beetle - dorsum
Beetle - lateral
Beetle - ventral
Beetle - thorax ventral
Beetle - sexual organs
Beetle - cephalus
Beetle - pronotum
Description:

Found under bark of dead wood (habitat pile)

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which a beetle (Oedemera (Oedemera) lurida) interacts

Comments

Martin Harvey's picture

colour

Andy, do these photos give a true idea of the colour? Based on shape this looks like Oedemera lurida to me, but that is usually much greener.

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Entomologist and biological recorder

andyk's picture

Colour

The colour is fairly accurate, with the elytral tips being virtually translucent. There is a slight green reflex from the pronotum, but this has not shown well on the photos.

Andy Keay

Mushroom Lady's picture

I'm curious to know how you

I'm curious to know how you photographed these. The detail is amazing.

Mushroom Lady

andyk's picture

Photographs

Hi Mushroom Lady,

These pictures were taken through a Nikon SMZ800 microscope using a GXCAM-3 camera. Not the best quality, but all that I could afford.

Andy Keay

Mushroom Lady's picture

Thanks. I'll look that up.

Thanks. I'll look that up. I'd like to get a microscope for fungi but haven't a clue where to begin.

Mushroom Lady

andyk's picture

Microscopes

I can recommend Brunel Microscopes - if you contact them they will give you good advice. They also do a range of pre-owned microscopes which represent good value.

Andy Keay

Mushroom Lady's picture

Thanks for your help, Andy.

Thanks for your help, Andy.

Mushroom Lady

Martin Harvey's picture

not sure of this one

I can't think what this could be other than Oedemera lurida, but the colour is wrong, and the rather pointed tips to the elytra don't look right. O. lurida is usually seen in summer, so I wonder if this is a specimen still in its pupation chamber, and thus not yet at its fully mature colour and shape? Not at all sure about that though.

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Entomologist and biological recorder

andyk's picture

I'm not sure either....

Hi Martin,

This specimen was found under dead bark in a 'habitat pile' of one year old Hawthorn stems and moved only very slowly but was definitely not in a pupation chamber. I initially thought that it was O. lurida, but it didn't look right to me either.

As I've got the specimen, is there anyone that I could send it to for a determination?

Andy Keay

Martin Harvey's picture

specimen

Andy, will send a reply via email.

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Entomologist and biological recorder

Martin Harvey's picture

specimen

Having now seen Andy's specimen of this beetle I think it is Oedemera lurida. The elytra appear to be unusually pointed in some of the photos, but this is because they are slightly rolled at the ends; they are the correct shape for lurida. The male aedeagus is also the correct shape, so it's only the colour that is odd.

Quite a lot of beetles spend only a short time as a pupa, and then when the adult emerges it may remain for a long time in a state of 'suspended animation' before emerging as a fully active adult later on. O. lurida is usually a summer insect (I've never seen it before mid-May), so I think this must represent an overwintering adult that hasn't yet acquired its summer colours. Or perhaps something has gone wrong and it has emerged at the wrong time of year.

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Entomologist and biological recorder

andyk's picture

Thanks Martin. As you say, it

Thanks Martin. As you say, it is very unusual to see O. lurida before mid/late May, so may be an overwintering specimen that woke up at the wrong time (don't know why 'cause it's still very cold in Chipstead valley!!)

Andy Keay