lordro's picture

Twa Cobies

Observed: 8th February 2011 By: lordrolordro’s reputation in Birdslordro’s reputation in Birdslordro’s reputation in Birds
Fine looking crows
Description:

No special reason to post this: I just admire crows

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Species with which Carrion Crow (Corvus corone) interacts

Comments

jan_rix's picture

could they be juvenile rooks?

I always find it hard to tell, but these ones have quite heavy bills, and I just wonder if they could be young rooks?

bobthebirder's picture

crows

It is hard to separate crows from young rooks, but not in early February!

Bob Ford

jan_rix's picture

ah, that was dim of me!!

ah, that was dim of me!!

anonymous spotter's picture

Great photo, great song -

The Steeleye Span version still sends a shiver down my spine:
"Ye'll sit on his white hause-bone,
And I'll pike out his bonny blue een;
With a lock o' golden hair
We'll, theek our nest when it grows bare"

George W's picture

'Cobies'

This is the first time I have heard (well, read) of crows being referred to as 'Cobies'.

Is this a local term for them and do you know where it originated from?

Regards
George

anonymous spotter's picture

Cobie (or Corbie)

Scots word - from the Old French via Latin, I think - hence "Corvid" for the crow family.

ophrys's picture

Cor!

Presumably the other way round...from Latin via Old French! Corvus being Latin for Crow, Corone the Greek for Crow and Corax Greek for a Raven. All words caught up with an Indo-european ancestry of ker- (?), which could possibly represent a sound-based origin, bearing in mind the noise they all make?

Ian
_________________

My Flickr photos...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/52163027@N02/

anonymous spotter's picture

Yes - my typo!

Should have said "from the Latin via the Old French".

George W's picture

Thanks...

...for the info.

The French practice (from an English point of view) of not pronouncing the last letter of a word and the tendency for (English) 'b' and 'v' to be interchangeable in translation of (ancient) Greek words makes sense of how 'corvid' can be pronounced/written as 'corbi' (or corbie).

Regards
George

lordro's picture

"Corbies"

What a gratifying and stimulating discussion! And I must confess that in my original posting 'cobies' is a careless typo: I meant 'corbies', as in the ballad (covered by Steeleye Span) collected by Scott in "Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border" (1803). However, language being ever fluid, we may have just launched 'cobie' as a further variant.

bobthebirder's picture

Twa Corbies

I prefer the version by the Corries.

Bob Ford

jayne57lord's picture

Twa corbies

I have heard that Lordro's granny used to sing the song and she was Northumbrian. I am pleasantly surprised that this appears to be a monochrome picture, on further investigation I question if this is strictly the case Lordro.