Graeme's picture

Hairy snail

Observed: 25th January 2011 By: Graeme
The Anton River Conservation Association
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Hairy Snail (Trochulus (Trochulus) hispidus) 25.1.11.Anton Lakes
Hairy Snail (Trochulus (Trochulus) hispidus) 25.1.11.Anton Lakes.2
Hairy Snail 1 26.1.11.Anton Lakes
Hairy Snail 1 26.1.11.Anton Lakes.2
Hairy Snail 1 26.1.11.Anton Lakes.3
Hairy Snail 1 26.1.11.Anton Lakes.4
Hairy Snail 2 26.1.11.Anton Lakes
Hairy Snail 2 26.1.11.Anton Lakes.2
Hairy Snail 2 26.1.11.Anton Lakes.3
Hairy Snail 2 26.1.11.Anton Lakes.4
Hairy Snail 2 26.1.11.Anton Lakes.5
Description:

There are two snails here, both hairy, but just incase they are different species, the second snail starts after the last picture with a ruler

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

andyk's picture

Hairy snail(s)

When posting pics of snails it is appropriate to show upper side, lower side and 'edge on' pics to assist others to help agree (or otherwise) your determination. It would also be helpful if there was an indication of the shell size - there are more than one 'hairy' snail species!

Andy Keay

Graeme's picture

Thank you for the pointers.I

Thank you for the pointers.I only started looking at snails last week.Didn't realise there were so many. I have gone back and looked under the same log for more of the snails and have added pictures with a ruler in view.

Wasn't sure how the height was measured, but from a side view on (as shown when held in hand)both the hairy snails I picked up today were 5-6mm

Graeme Davis

markgtelfer's picture

Two species

I think you may have got Trochulus hispidus (with the distinct umbilicus, pic 5) and Ashfordia granulata (with the closed umbilicus, pics 9 & 10).

andyk's picture

Thanks Mark.

Thanks Mark.

Andy Keay

Brian Cambridgeshire's picture

Trochulus hispidus and Ashfordia granulata

I agree with Mark. The other distinctive features are that Ashfordia has straight hairs, not curved, and has a paler, more translucent shell, through which you can more easily see some of the internal organs. These features can be useful because a second Trochulus species, sericeus (= plebeia) has an almost-closed umbilicus.

martinjohnbishop's picture

Ashfordia hairs

There is a picture which compares Ashfordia and Trochulus

http://www.wildlifeinformation.co.uk/recording_events_lennoxlove_2010072...

but the hairs of neither look straight. Is it really true that Ashfordia hairs are always straight?

Brian Cambridgeshire's picture

Straight... err..

I think the hairs probably start off straight - as in some of the photos here, they can seem to radiate from the shell, almost as if held out by static electricity. But if the shell rolls around much (or is handled by an observer), they can easily get bent a little. In the field, the paler shell and the dark-and-pale marbling of the digestive and albumen glands showing through (as in the last photo here) is a good clue that you've got Ashfordia. This is a feature it shares with Monacha cantiana (Ashfordia is in subfamily Monachinae of Helicidae).