erimalb's picture

20101231_338

Observed: 20th December 2010 By: erimalb
20101231_338
20101231_339
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Description:

red fungi 6 to 8 inches tall turns black after what looks like flowers open .has lots of white
spoors .best described as looking a bit like
cauliflower.

Identifications
Species interactions

No interactions present.

Comments

Blewit Boy's picture

Not sure that's..............

Not sure that's fungi. Looks more like an inflorescence.

chris

Jonathan's picture

What is it growing on? Looks

What is it growing on? Looks like a grass, or a crop of some kind. Could this be a parasite such as Striga? This has very tiny seeds that could look like spores.

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

erimalb's picture

fungi

Hi it was growing on grass not sure its a parasite as it was not anywhere near to a host
it was growing directly out of the ground.

Jonathan's picture

The host could be the grass!

The host could be the grass! Were any parts of this plant green?

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

erimalb's picture

No the roots were 6/7 inches

No the roots were 6/7 inches under the grass when I dug around the plant it was very red under the surface .as the plant was exposed to the elements it seamed to open up turn black.I will upload some more pics.

Jonathan's picture

Thanks for adding the extra

Thanks for adding the extra pictures. These prove that this is a plant and not a fungus. If you look at the high res version you can see flowers with 3 anthers. I moved your observation from fungi to plants where it will attract the attention of the right experts.

I am more convinced than ever that what you have here is a parasitic flowering plant. Hopefully someone will be able to pin the ID down more precisely for you.

There is a parasitic plants group on Flickr http://www.flickr.com/groups/parasitic-plants/pool/with/5294032488/
But I cannot see anything exactly like what you have in the images there. The nearest (though by no means the same) is Hyobanche from South Africa. I think your plant is probably in the same family, though. The Orobanchaceae (broomrapes).

Jonathan
University of Edinburgh and Biodiversity Observatory (OU)

erimalb's picture

Thanks for your help Jonathan

Thanks for your help Jonathan hope some more experts can identify.

Regards Robb

Tony Rebelo's picture

Southern African Website

Please note that there is a Southern African iSpot at http://za.ispot.org.uk where you are likely to get faster and more accurate identification of local species.

Alex Dreyer's picture

Subspecies ?

Has the subspecies been dropped. The SA plant used to be Sarcophyte sanguinea subsp. sanguinea and the plants from tropical Africa (Zim and northwards) was Sarcophyte sanguinea subsp piriei, but is now called Sarcophyte piriei Hutch.

See here and here

Alex Dreyer
www.kyffhauser.com

Tony Rebelo's picture

Interesting

Several issues here.

Firstly, Zim uses Sarcophyte sanguinea subsp. sanguinea (it does not sink the subspecies), even though it does not occur there.
Secondly, it seems very suspicious that Sarcophyte sanguinea (subsp. sanguinea) occurs in ZA and Sarcophyte piriei occurs in Zim and Moz - although both occur in Moz.

Note that Sarcophyte piriei was originally described and then sunk into Sarcophyte sanguinea. I cannot find the reference that reinstated the species.

http://plants.jstor.org/stable/10.5555/al.ap.flora.floc013431

Cassine's picture

This is still

Sarcophyte sanguinea subsp. piriei. At the time this name was not available here and still not. The long inflorescence branches in the cut open photo is distinctive. There are a number of other differences based on the shape and size of pollen but I cannot remember more. I would prefer to make an inclusive name with a link than a name without. Some websites are still using the older S. piriei.

Alex Dreyer's picture

Sarcophyte sanguinea subsp. sanguinea

This ID should then be updated to Sarcophyte sanguinea subsp. sanguinea ?

What are the physical differences between subsp. sanguinea and subsp. piriei ?

Alex Dreyer
www.kyffhauser.com

Tony Rebelo's picture

Please post ID ...

Please post ID ...

Alex Dreyer's picture

Update ID

Sorry, I missed the location of this observation. This is probably more likely to be Sarcophyte sanguinea subsp. piriei.

Alex Dreyer
www.kyffhauser.com

Tony Rebelo's picture

Have updated the database,

Have updated the database, but will take a LONG time to get onto iSpot at this rate ...